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yield components (fruit length, width, and weight) in Hanoi, Vietnam, and Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar during two seasons (2016–17 and 2018–19). Two seeds of each entry was sown into a sterilized commercial coconut coir on 1 and 25 Sept. 2016 in Hanoi and Nay

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. Consequently, reduced honey bee foraging during key pollination periods may negatively impact fruit set and other yield components in blueberry cultivated in western Washington and elsewhere in the PNW. In addition to the reduced foraging activity during

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Abstract

Yield component analysis was used to study the components of yield diversity in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.). The proportion of uprights flowering and fruit-set were identified as important contributors to yield diversity. Numbers of uprights, flowers per flowering upright, and fruit-size were less important. Isolated yield components were largely influenced by uncontrolled variation. However, component compensation effects were identified. Fruit-set compensated for uprights/dm2 in several areas. Fruit-size compensated for uprights/dm2 and fruit-set for flower number in only one area. Fruit-set and fruit-size were positively correlated in two cases. The numerical techniques employed have positively identified promising areas for further research.

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Abstract

Individual plants of 3 cultivars of peas (Pisum sativum L.)—‘Early Frosty’, ‘Darkskin Perfection 70A’, and ‘Puget 715’—were harvested to derive the plant yield components: numbers of filled pods, seeds/pod, seeds/plant, and fresh mean seed weight at processing maturity. These cultivars differed for number of filled pods, seeds/pods, and seeds/plant, but not for mean fresh seed weight. Following the conversion of yield component data to the log scale, a sequential yield component analysis was conducted via serial inclusion in a multiple regression equation. Both forward and backward sequential yield component analyses were computed. Across the 3 cultivars, the yield component contributing most to plant variation was pod number in both the forward and backward analysis. Contributions of the yield components to the total yield variation, ranked in declining order of importance for the forward analysis, were number of pods (73.6%), seeds/pod (13.6%), and weight/seed (12.9%). Backward analysis did not change the ranking, and the respective percentages were 47.9%, 40.6%, and 11.5%. Yields estimated through yield components were 7% to 14% higher than those measured from harvested plots.

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Abbreviations: PC, principal component. We acknowledge the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station for their support of this research. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations

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Abstract

Differences were observed both within and between strawberry cultivars in the relative importance of yield components. Most cultivars had high coefficients among yield, crown density at harvest, and fruit number/crown, but there was variation among cultivars in the coefficients between yield and fruit weight.

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Abstract

A field study was conducted to determine the effects of rhizobial inoculation (cowpea ‘EL’ mixed strain) and N-fertilization with 100 kg/ha nitrate nitrogen (CaNO3 — 15.5% N) on seed and biomass yield in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. Four indeterminate cultivars, ‘Mississippi Silver’, ‘California Blackeye #5’, ‘Lady’, ‘Brown Crowder’, and one determinate, early maturing cultivar, ‘Bush Purple Hull’, were used. Seed yield in inoculated and N-fertilized plants was significantly greater than that of the unfertilized, uninoculated control treatment. Generally, yield of inoculated plants was equivalent to or greater than that obtained with 100 kg N. The indeterminate cultivars yielded more biomass than did ‘Bush Purple Hull’ in all 3 treatments. Seed yield was higher in the indeterminate cultivars with inoculation or N-fertilization than in ‘Bush Purple Hull’; however, there were no significant differences in seed yield among cultivars in the control treatment. Harvest index in the indeterminate cultivars was increased by inoculation but not by N-fertilization. Harvest index of ‘Bush Purple Hull’ was at least 3 times higher than the indeterminate cultivars. Among the major seed yield components, only pods/plant was influenced by all 3 treatments, whereas seeds/pod and seed weight were fairly stable and cultivar specific. Standardized regression analysis revealed that pods/plant was the major component which accounted for the variability in seed yield of inoculated plants within a cultivar, but not in ‘Bush Purple Hull’, where dry matter accumulation/plant/day was the major component. Factor analysis on the yield and N2 fixation components also indicated that cowpea cultivars behaved differently in the expression of traits which influenced seed yield. A measure of genetic divergence among these cultivars using Mahalanobis distances confirmed that the 5 cowpea cultivars differed significantly.

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Abstract

A trial of six raspberry (Rubus ideaus L.) cultivars was established to study the effects of primocane removal, using dinoseb, on yield and its components. In 1982 through 1984, sprays were applied using both single and multiple follow-up treatments with and without shielding the primocanes in the immediate stool area. The effects of cultivars and treatments on yield components were studied by two-dimensional partitioning of the variation in marketable yield. When primocanes were removed, the cultivars had fewer canes, larger fruit, and increased marketable yield. Cultivars differed in their requirements for treatment because some cultivars produced canes more readily than others. Higher-yielding cultivars generally had fewer canes and greater length of laterals. Chemical name used: 2-(1-methylpropyl)-4,6-dinitrophenoI (dinoseb).

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is high and stable yield and yield components. Breeders must examine whether a given cultivar is better adapted to a specific type of environment, and whether its performance is stable relative to that of other cultivars. Predictable performance over

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Twenty-seven triploid watermelon cultivars and/or breeding lines were evaluated for yield and quality components. Total yield, rind thickness, mature and immature seed count, incidence of hollow heart, soluble solids, sugars, pH, titratable acidity, and internal color were measured for each cultivar/breeding line. Yields ranged from 32,000 to 66,000 kg per hectare. `Jack of Hearts' was the highest yielding cultivar. Hollow heart was moderate to severe in five of the genotypes. Except for two breeding lines, soluble solids were at least 11 per cent. Rind thickness ranged from 15.0 to 22.2 mm. Little or no mature seed was present in most of the genotypes. The cultivar `Millionaire' and the CLF breeding lines, with the exception of CLF 1016, contained the most mature seeds. A range of internal color and individual sugar content (fructose, glucose, sucrose) existed between genotypes.

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