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Danijela Janjanin, Marko Karoglan, Mirjana Herak Ćustić, Marijan Bubola, Mirela Osrečak and Igor Palčić

, treatment with the highest yeast assimilable N content was C, regardless of no fertilization ( Table 3 ). This treatment significantly increased YAN content compared with all other treatments except UR. Table 3. Effect of nitrogen foliar treatments on must

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Gregory Peck, Megan McGuire, Thomas Boudreau IV and Amanda Stewart

the high crop load treatment had the lowest TA. Fig. 1. Yeast assimilable nitrogen of juice from ‘York’/‘M.9’ apple trees with low [two fruit per branch cross-sectional area (BCSA)], medium (four fruit per BCSA), and high (six fruit per BCSA) crop

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Alison L. Reeve, Patricia A. Skinkis, Amanda J. Vance, Jungmin Lee and Julie M. Tarara

yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) and YAN components at harvest from vineyard floor management and crop level treatments from 2011 to 2013. Leaf tissue N at bloom and véraison had a strong linear relationship with juice YAN at harvest ( Fig. 5 ). YAN

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R. Paul Schreiner and Carolyn F. Scagel

titratable acidity) were determined as previously described ( Sweet and Schreiner, 2010 ). Yeast assimilable nitrogen concentration in must was determined by summing primary amino acid-N obtained by o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) assay ( Dukes and Butzke, 1998 ) and

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Bruce I. Reisch, R. Stephen Luce and Anna Katharine Mansfield

). In 2010 and years after, juice was also analyzed for yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) by enzymatic analysis. Wines were analyzed for pH and titratable acidity as described previously and for organic acids (tartaric, malic, lactic) by high

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Bruce I. Reisch, R. Stephen Luce and Anna Katharine Mansfield

titratable acidity [expressed as Tartaric acid equivalents (TAE)] on a Titrino Plus 848 titrator and 869 autosampler (Metrohm USA, Riverview, FL). Beginning in 2010, juice was also analyzed for yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) by enzymatic analysis. Wines

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Matthew Clark, Peter Hemstad and James Luby

-SC pH probe with auto-sampling (Mettler-Toledo, Columbus, OH). Juice was analyzed for free amino nitrogen (FAN), yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN), and malic acid concentration by enzymatic analysis (UniTAB™, Unitech Scientific, HIan Gardens, CA). A

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Brianna L. Ewing, Gregory M. Peck, Sihui Ma, Andrew P. Neilson and Amanda C. Stewart

reported as gallic acid equivalents ( Waterhouse, 2002 ). Primary amino nitrogen (PAN) was measured using the ultraviolet method with a Megazyme Primary Amino Nitrogen kit (Megazyme International, Ireland) ( Dukes and Butzke, 1998 ). Yeast assimilable

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Letizia Tozzini, Paolo Sabbatini and G. Stanley Howell

consistently higher when LA-to-crop weight ratio is increased ( Fig. 2 ). Table 6. Correlations among juice composition (percent soluble solids, %SS; yeast available amino-nitrogen, Amino-N) and shoot source sink parameters (leaf area, LA; and leaf area

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Alison L. Reeve, Patricia A. Skinkis, Amanda J. Vance, Katherine R. McLaughlin, Elizabeth Tomasino, Jungmin Lee and Julie M. Tarara

-long measurement period for consistency across the sampling period. Fruit composition. Basic ripeness, including TSS, pH, titratable acidity (TA), and yeast-assimilable nitrogen (YAN), was measured using juice pressed from clusters at harvest as described in Reeve