Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,871 items for :

  • woody plant x
Clear All

). Specific to woody plant liner production in Tennessee, Dickerson et al. (1983) investigated production costs for three common nursery crop liners starting from rooted cuttings. While formulae developed in these studies remain beneficial to the industry

Full access

varieties. GE is supported by rapidly expanding science and technology but, to our knowledge, has not led to any commercial releases for woody ornamental plants. We will consider the technical approaches and limitations of both approaches as well as the

Free access

different study techniques affected student performance in woody landscape plant materials courses. The specific objectives of this study were to determine the relationships among study technique, overall grade point average (GPA), learning style, and

Full access

bad but results in an increase in irrigation frequency to maintain adequate moisture for plant growth. There are no universally accepted standards for substrate physical properties ( Bilderback et al., 2005 ). For container-grown woody plants, some

Full access
Author:

Growth characteristics and marketing of woody ornamentals prevent crop scheduling common in floriculture crops. However, many tasks in the production of woody ornamentals require coordination with the season and/or physiological state of the species. Since most woody ornamental nurseries produce many species or cultivars, a variety of tasks occur concurrently. This review highlights the major tasks required during production for most species of woody plants. The physiological and environmental factors that dictate or influence scheduling are discussed.

Free access

increase shoot growth. Despite BMP recommendations, there is evidence that <5 mg·L −1 P in substrate pore-water is sufficient for growing salable woody plants in soilless substrates. In a substrate consisting of 2 perlite : 1 peat (by volume), Havis and

Free access
Author:

Secure identification of individual plants by some kind of labels in the field is an important part of many types of horticultural, plant science, and ecological research. This report describes implanted microchips as one method of plant tagging that is reliable, durable, and secure. This technology may be especially useful in long-term experiments involving perennial woody plants. Two methods are described for implanting microchips in citrus trees that would also be applicable to other woody plant species. One method of implanting microchips is demonstrated to have no deleterious effect on citrus tree growth through the first 18 months after implantation into the tree. Since microchips implanted beneath the bark will become more deeply embedded in wood as the plants grow, signal penetration through wood was evaluated and determined to be sufficient for long-term field utility. Implanted microchips are potentially useful for secure tagging of valuable or endangered plant species to deter theft by providing secure and conclusive identification.

Full access
Author:

Abstract

When one searches the literature for information pertaining to the nutrition of woody ornamental plants it soon becomes obvious that there has not been too much published in this field. And most of the experimental work on the nutrition of trees has been concerned with varying combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Also, most of the work that is reported was done in the field, either to trees growing in the landscape or in nurseries and as a result most of the studies report a positive response only to the application of nitrogen and little or no response to the application of phosphorus or potassium. A brief review of some of the literature on fertilizer experiments is contained in the works of Wikle (18) and Himeleck (9). Since this symposium is concerned with potassium in horticulture, I will confine most of my remarks to the place that this mineral element has on the growth and development of woody ornamental plants.

Open Access

To examine injuries caused by freezing temperature, six woody plants were placed under temperatures ranging from 0 to 20C. Control plants were placed at 0 or –2C, depending on the field sampling period. Freezing tests were done three times (September, October, and November) during the fall. In 1992, six species were tested: Genista tinctoria `Lydia', Parthenocissus `Veitchii', Weigela × florida `Variegata', Spiraea japonica `Shirobana', Spiraea japonica `Coccinea', and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi. After testing, all plants were stored at –2C for the remainder of the winter. The following May, plants were repotted into containers. Effects of freezing temperatures on plant growth were recorded at the end of the following summer. Preliminary results indicate that the most sensitive species to cold temperatures were Parthenocissus `Veitchii' and Arctostaphylos uvaursi. Plants of these two species did not survive the summer. However, for the third sampling period, Parthenocissus `Veitchii' (–18C) had better cold hardiness than A. uva-ursi (–9.5C). Genista tinctoria `Lydia' appeared to have the same cold hardiness (–10C) for the three sampling periods. The last three species had shown increasing cold hardiness beginning at around –8C in September to about –18C in November.

Free access

container-grown woody plants that differed in their water use demand under different growing environments. Materials and Methods Experiment locations and plants. A series of experiments were conducted to test physiologically based and DWU irrigation systems

Free access