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for IDM. However, little work has been done on consumers’ willingness to purchase alternatives, especially with the likelihood of crop failure if successive plantings of impatiens are made in the same areas. The objectives of this study were to perform

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of the peach nor how consumers use peaches (consumption). Therefore, the main objectives of this research were to 1) assess the effect of production region when consumers purchase a peach, that is, are consumers willing to pay more for a locally grown

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about, the use of locally sourced flowers was found to be the most influential change that a floral provider could make to increasing a consumer’s willingness to purchase. Respondents also indicate a strong willingness to pay a premium to retail floral

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aesthetics for pollinator insects. U.S. consumers were also willing to pay premiums to aid pollinator insects. Diffendorfer et al. (2014) found U.S. consumers were willing to pay a one-time payment of $4.78 billion to $6.64 billion to purchase monarch

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the following: Overall, I would be more willing to make purchases from a retail floral provider that is environmentally friendly than from a retail floral provider that is not environmentally friendly. And: All other considerations held the same, I

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how various external attributes associated with fruits and vegetables affect consumer likelihood of purchase and willingness to pay (WTP) for consumers already purchasing local and organic produce. External attributes included type of product

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marketing and sales of native plants. We hypothesized that if consumers knew the benefits of grasses native to Minnesota and how these plants support butterflies, moths, and other wildlife, they would be more willing to purchase these grasses, thus

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certified. As another example, in the Model B column, the EEI of 0.55 in the third profile suggests that the respondents who had not purchased organic food were willing to pay only 55% of the price for apples that were organically grown in other regions and

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processed rhizomes. Maintaining freshness, appearance, and nutritional quality of lotus rhizomes is of paramount importance to consumers. According to telephone interviews ( Sand et al., 2012 ), all produce managers surveyed were willing to purchase fresh

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purchases. We found differences in preferences, WTP, and quality evaluation between frequent and infrequent apple buyers. Generally speaking, consumers revealed stronger preferences and were willing to pay more for newer rather than more established apple

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