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, which is often referred to as “weed mat” ( Strik, 2016 ). Weed mat is more economical for weed control than sawdust, and it can have a positive effect on yield in blueberry ( Strik et al., 2017a ; Strik and Vance, 2017 ). Weed mat captures more longwave

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majority of new plantings are now established using black woven polypropylene landscape groundcover (“weed mat”) in organic and conventional systems ( Strik, 2016 ) because it is the most economical method of weed control ( Strik and Vance, 2017 ) and can

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black, woven polypropylene landscape groundcover, which is often referred to as “weed mat” ( Strik, 2016 ). Weed mat is becoming more common because it is more economical for weed control than sawdust, and it can have a positive effect on yield in

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(sawdust, yard-debris compost topped with sawdust, and a porous, black, polyethylene groundcover called weed mat) in two cultivars (Duke and Liberty). Results from this trial showed improved root growth and yield during establishment with planting on raised

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contact herbicides are commonly used in conventional blackberry plantings ( Barney et al., 2007 ; Bushway et al., 2008 ), but chemical options are limited for organic production. Perforated landscape fabric, often referred to as weed mat, is an

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continue the work by Harkins et al. (2013 , 2014 ) and Dixon et al. (2015a , 2015b ) and examine the effects of cultivar (Black Diamond and Marion), postharvest irrigation, weed management (weed mat, hand-weeded, and nonweeded), and primocane training

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., 2013 ; Meyers et al., 2014 ). Weed mat, or porous landscape fabric, has been used successfully to manage weeds in various production systems ( Dixon et al., 2015 ; Harkins et al., 2013 ; Makus, 2011 ; Meyers et al., 2014 ). It is particularly well

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blackberry fields include hand-weeding, use of woven landscape fabric (often referred to as “weed cloth” or “weed mat”), and no or limited weeding. In the latter case, weeds are typically removed during the first few months after planting to help establish

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remove them only before harvest. However, weeds compete with blackberry plants and can significantly reduce yield when left unmanaged ( Harkins et al., 2013 ; Meyers et al., 2014 ). The use of a perforated landscape fabric, or “weed mat,” as a barrier to

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10% of its total N during decomposition for several years after application ( Gale et al., 2006 ; Sikora and Szmidt, 2001 ). Weed mat or landscape fabric, an inert mulch ( Granatstein and Mullinix, 2008 ) approved for use as a weed barrier by the

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