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Irrigated horticulture is essential for human health and welfare. Improved human nutrition can be achieved through improved horticultural productivity and quality, which in turn is often related to irrigation practices. Fresh water for horticulture

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treatments ( Table 2 ). The water productivity (seed yield per unit of water used; Oweis and Hachum, 2006 ) was 50% higher ( P = 0.01) for plants from the dry treatment ( Table 2 ). As observed in Expt. 1, seed germinability was similar for both treatments

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applied for crop production as a result of the reduced water supply without a significant yield reduction ( Gheysari et al., 2017 ; Kang and Zhang, 2004 ; Yang et al., 2017 ). Although atmospheric VPD mediates water flow and constrains water productivity

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38 Colloquium 1 (Abstr. 700–705) Water Management and Water Relations of Horticultural Crops

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irrigate ornamental and landscape plants. If left untreated, the direct application of saline water may adversely affect the growth, flowering, and productivity of different plants. Carter and Grieve (2008 ) indicated that irrigating two snapdragon

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efficiency, pulse drip increased productivity in the present study by ≈0.3 kg of fruit per m 3 of water applied in 2019 and by 1.3 kg of fruit per m 3 of water applied in 2020. Efficiency was much higher during the latter year due to more rain ( Table 1

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directions Ann. Appl. Biol. 147 211 226 Patanè, C. Tringali, S. Sortino, H. 2011 Effects of deficit irrigation on biomass, yield, water productivity, and fruit quality of processing tomato under semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions Sci. Hort. 129 590

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Abstract

Root competition (tree density), summer pruning, and regulated irrigation were studied to determine whether they can be used to control tree vigor and productivity in ultra-dense orchards of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch]. All methods appeared to inhibit tree growth, but regulated irrigation combined with root competition generated from high tree density was most effective. Fruit yields and fruit growth were significantly increased (up to 30%) by high tree density combined with low rate of water application when water stress limited shoot growth but stimulated subsequent fruit growth. Periods of low rate of water application are specified.

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Individual and interactive effects of restricted root volume (RRV) and regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) on productivity and water use of peach trees [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch `Golden Queen'] were studied over 3 years (1992-95). Trees were grown in lysimeters of five different soil volumes (0.025, 0.06, 0.15, 0.4, and 1.0 m3) with either full or deficit (RDI) irrigation. In Years 3 and 4, fruit size was reduced by up to 30% on trees in the two smallest volumes. Tree water use was positively related to increasing soil volume (linear, P < 0.001; quadratic, P < 0.011) in all years ranging from 1.8 to 4.4 L·mm-1 Epan in the post-RDI period of Year 2. Water use of deficit-irrigated trees was less than fully irrigated trees and there was an interaction between soil volume and irrigation treatment during RDI. Water relations did not limit growth or productivity. Tree water use was reduced under root restriction as a consequence of canopy demand rather than leaf function. Results suggest that a combination of restricted root volume and development of water stress achieve the RDI response in the Goulburn Valley, Australia.

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Chayote (Sechium edule Swartz) is a minor vegetable crop gaining in popularity in the U.S., but with only scant cultural information on it available. The soil pH and water requirements-and the effects of various soil amendments on plant productivity were detemined in three separate greenhouse pot studies. Chayote plants were grown in either one of eight soil pH levels (5.0 to 6.5), were watered at one of three rates (1.3, 2.5, or 5.0 cm per week), or were planted in one of 16 soil amendment treatments (Oliver silt loam soil or a 1 soil: 1 peat moss (v/v) mix amended with inorganic N-P-K fertilizer, 25 or 50 kg cow or rabbit manure/ha, or 12.5 or 25 kg chicken manure/ha). Data on date of germination, plant height, single and total leaf areas, total plant and separate plant part fresh and dry weights, and presence of flowers were collected. Greatest plant productivity was achieved with a soil pH range of 5.6 to 6.5, a watering rate of 2.5 cm per week, and with several of the soil amendment treatments.

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