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Jameel M. Al-Khayri, Feng H. Huang, Teddy E. Morelock and Tahani A. Busharar

A preliminary study has shown that the addition of 15% (v/v) coconut water (CW) to the culture medium significantly improved callus growth, shoot-regenerative capacity, and shoot growth in leaf disk cultures of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Subsequently, the influence of a range of CW concentrations, 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% (v/v), was examined. Callus weight obtained after 5 weeks showed direct relationship to the concentration of CW. This stimulator action was observed in both cultivars tested in this study, `High Pack' and `Baker'. On CW-containing medium, shoot regeneration was expedited to 4 to 5 weeks compared with 8 to 12 weeks on a CW-free medium. Callus of `Baker' induced on a CW-free medium exhibited a significant increase in shoot regeneration frequency when transferred to a regeneration medium enriched with CW, suggesting that the addition of CW to the regeneration medium only is sufficient to achieve improved regeneration.

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Joshua D. Butcher, Charles P. Laubscher and Johannes C. Coetzee

and the production of essential oils in P. tomentosum. Literature Cited Ben-Yaakov, S. Ben-Asher, Y. 1982 Continuous measurements of dissolved oxygen in water culture by a self-calibrating monitor Water Res. 16 169 172 Bonachela, S. Vargas, J.A. Acuña

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Myung Min Oh, Young Yeol Cho, Kee Sung Kim and Jung Eek Son

Subirrigation, such as the ebb-and-flow culture (EBB) system, is a popular method in containerized plant production for controlling the application of fertilizer, water, and pesticides, and for improving production efficiency ( Dole et al., 1994

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Janet E.A. Seabrook and Gerald Farrell

Stock plants of `Shepody' and `Yukon Gold' potato (Solarium tuberosum L.) were grown in a greenhouse and irrigated with city water. Contamination rate of stem explant tissue cultures excised from these stock plants was 50% to 100%. A comparison of the microorganisms isolated from the contaminated cultures and from 0.22-μm filter disks through which 20 liters of city water had passed revealed the presence of similar bacterial floras. Five genera of bacteria (Listerium spp., Corynebacterium spp., Enterobacter spp., Pasteurella spp., and Actinobacillus spp.) were isolated from contaminated cultures and cultured filter disks. Watering greenhouse-grown stock plants with filtered city water decreased contamination of stem explant cultures 30% to 50%. Installing an ultraviolet light water-sterilizing unit at the greenhouse inlet point effectively reduced contamination.

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Thomas E. Marler and Haluk M. Discekici

`Honey Jean #3' sweet corn was planted in one-half of a split-root culture system containing `Tainung 1' or `Known You 1' papaya seedlings to determine if papaya roots could transfer water to the corn seedlings. After the corn seedlings were established, water was withheld from both compartments (2/2) or only the compartment containing the corn seedlings (1/2). Control plants were grown with both halves well-watered. Pre-dawn relative water content (RWC) of corn leaves was measured as an indicator of drought stress. Following 11 days, root competition was relieved in half of the 1/2 plants by cutting the papaya root connection between the half with corn from the rest of the papaya culture system. RWC of 1/2 corn plants was maintained above that of 2/2 plants, but below that of control plants. After relieving root competition, the 1/2 plants in competition with papaya roots maintained higher RWC than the 1/2 plants relieved of competition. Leaf tissue of all corn plants except the control plants was necrotic by 30 days. The results indicate that development of drought stress in corn using this culture system was retarded by watering a portion of the papaya roots not associated with the corn roots. Drought stress was accelerated by relief of competition with papaya, which is evidence that water was being supplied by the papaya roots within the papaya/corn system.

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Ahmed Obeidy and M. A. L. Smith

120 ORAL SESSION (Abstr. 605–612) CROSS-COMMODITY TISSUE CULTURE IV

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Ahmed Obeidy and M. A. L. Smith

120 ORAL SESSION (Abstr. 605–612) CROSS-COMMODITY TISSUE CULTURE IV

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Miguel Urrestarazu, Isidro Morales, Tommaso La Malfa, Ruben Checa, Anderson F. Wamser and Juan E. Álvaro

It is estimated that in the Spanish Southeast, there is a soilless surface of ≈5500 ha (13,590.80 acres) ( Urrestarazu, 2013 ) that consumes ≈500 to 700 L (109.98 to 153.98 gal) of water per square meter each year. Water use in soilless culture

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M.C. Palada, W. M. Cole, S.M.A Crossman, J.E. Rakocy and J.A. Kowalski

142 POSTER SESSION 24 Culture & Management/Vegetable Crops & Herbs

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Luis A. Valdez-Aguilar, Catherine M. Grieve, James Poss and Michael A. Mellano

crops, are glycophytes ( Greenway and Munns, 1980 ) because they have evolved under conditions of low soil salinity. Cut flower growers are reluctant to use poor-quality water for irrigation because floricultural species are believed to be highly