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Yuan-Tsung Chang, Shyh-Shyan Wang, Der-Ming Yeh and Wen-Ju Yang

The genus Limonium , belonging to Plumbaginaceae, consists of ≈300 species ( Burchi et al., 2006 ). Plants of Limonium are grown worldwide in the field or under protection as fresh or dried cut flowers. Differential vernalization is required for

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Sonali R. Padhye and Arthur C. Cameron

Vernalization is defined as the promotion of flowering initiated by a cold treatment ( Chouard, 1960 ; Thomas and Vince-Prue, 1984 ; Vince-Prue, 1975 ). Vernalization is quantitative in nature, and the intensity of the response is a function of

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María S. Alessandro and Claudio R. Galmarini

requires vernalization to induce flowering. During the first year it produces a basal rosette of leaves and stores carbohydrates in its hypertrophic root ( Whitaker et al., 1970 ). The stage of growth when carrot seedlings are not responsive to low

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Charles L. Rohwer and Royal D. Heins

communication), most likely because of noninductive temperature or photoperiod conditions during and before the early stages of induction in early to mid-October. Vernalization from 10 to 15 °C may substitute for the short-day (SD) phase (thermoinduction

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Sonali R. Padhye and Arthur C. Cameron

manipulation of environmental factors, including photoperiod and temperature, to promote flower induction. Flowering of many winter annuals, biennials, and perennials is promoted after exposure to low temperatures. This phenomenon, known as vernalization, has

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Christopher J. D’Angelo and Irwin L. Goldman

growing seasons of northern climates. Vernalization, the process during which exposure to cold temperatures over an extended period expedites or induces floral initiation ( Chouard, 1960 ), is an important feature for breeding and producing seed from

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Beth A. Fausey and Arthur C. Cameron

Many herbaceous winter annual, biennial, and perennial plants require vernalization, exposure to low temperatures, for flower induction ( Chouard, 1960 ; Thomas and Vince-Prue, 1984 ). While vernalization responses of numerous plant species have

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Min Lin, Terri W. Starman, Yin-Tung Wang and Genhua Niu

10 to 15 nodes each with a leaf and an axillary inflorescence that may develop two to six flowers. The nobile dendrobiums need a period of vernalization after maturation to induce flowering. Ichihashi (1997) reported that 15 °C chilling was required

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Esther E. McGinnis, Alan G. Smith and Mary H. Meyer

controlling flowering ( Sung and Amasino, 2004 ). Vernalization is defined as the application of a cold treatment to a growing plant to promote flowering ( Chouard, 1960 ; Taiz and Zeiger, 2006 ). By itself, vernalization does not result in floral initiation

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Katrina J.M. Hodgson-Kratky and David J. Wolyn

, such as photoperiod and temperature ( Thomas et al., 2006 ). TKS can require a period of cool temperatures, known as vernalization, to induce flowering ( Borthwick et al., 1943 ). This is common in temperate perennials because it encourages flowering