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, coupled with the ability to extend N availability over a growing season, has led researchers to examine slow-release N fertilizers in vegetable crop production systems ( Sanchez and Doerge, 1999 ). This review article will summarize that body of work

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The revision of the Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Commercial Vegetable Production was made possible by USDA project 97-EPMP-1-0127 funded by the Northeast IPM Grants Program.

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). Agricultural education lacked a focus on women’s farms that are characterized by limited acreage; production of vegetables, fruits, cheese, or flowers; diverse herds; use of alternative marketing strategies; and organic and sustainable practices” ( Kiernan et

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The first objective of this paper is to review and characterize the published research in refereed journals pertaining to the nutritional practices used to grow vegetable transplants. The second objective is to note those studies that indicated a direct relationship between transplant nutritional practices and field performance. The third objective is to suggest some approaches that are needed in future vegetable transplant nutrition research. Even after review of the plethora of available information in journals, it is not possible to summarize the one best way to grow any vegetable transplant simply because of many interacting and confounding factors that moderate the effects of nutritional treatments. It is, however, important to recognize that all these confounding factors must be considered when developing guidelines for producing transplants. After thorough review of this information, it is concluded that transplant nutrition generally has a long term effect on influencing yield potential. Therefore, derivation of a nutritional regime to grow transplants needs to be carefully planned. It is hoped that the information that follows can be used to help guide this process.

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Reports mentioning quality of vegetables being affected by grafting began as early as the 1940s. Imazu (1949) recommended Cucurbita moschata (Duchesne ex. Poir) as a rootstock for Cucumis melo , because it conferred resistance to Fusarium

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The historical effects of El Niño/La Niña events on supplies of selected fresh vegetables and melons (Cucumis melo L.) were evaluated by estimating single-equation supply relationships. Economic variables in the estimated equations were, generally, of the correct sign and significant at usual levels. El Niño events had a negative and statistically significant effect on the Texas muskmelon, Florida fall squash [Praecitrullus fistulosus Stocks) Pang.] and the California fall lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) supply with expected production declines of 15%, 21%, and 5% relative to historical mean production. In contrast, the expected supplies of United States summer onions (Allium cepa L.) and Florida fall and winter tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) increased about 7%, 10%, and 25% during El Niño events. La Niña events had a negative and significant effect on Texas muskmelon, honeydew, and watermelon, with supplies expected to decline 20%, 29%, and 13% with the occurrence of this event.

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143 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 612–623) Sustainable Production–Vegetables

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Poster Session 45—Vegetable Nutrition 21 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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