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Xinjuan Chen, Zhujun Zhu, Joska Gerendás and Nadine Zimmermann

., 1996 ; Sang et al., 1984 ). Brassica campestris vegetables play an important role in the Chinese diet, and so their naturally occurring GSs in edible parts should be monitored. To our knowledge, there is limited information about the comparison of

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Kalpana K.C. Adhikari, Mary Ruth McDonald and Bruce D. Gossen

Clubroot, caused by the soilborne protist Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin, has long been recognized as an important disease of Brassica vegetable crops worldwide, and most Brassica spp. are highly susceptible. Management of clubroot is a

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Mary Ruth McDonald and Sean M. Westerveld

, as a result of the high waterholding capacity of the organic soil. Overall, the research indicates that several strategies can be used to reduce clubroot severity in Asian Brassica vegetables in Ontario. Seeding susceptible crops in early spring

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Xi Wang, Genhua Niu, Mengmeng Gu, Paul A. Baumann and Joseph Masabni

crops in different cropping systems ( Haramoto and Gallandt, 2005 ). There are about 20 GSLs in Brassica species, with concentrations varying among species and also within different plant tissues ( Kirkegaard and Sarwar, 1998 ). Sinapis alba ‘IdaGold

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Charles F. Forney and Michael A. Jordan

Contribution No. 2188 of the Atlantic Food & Horticulture Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. We thank Charles Thompson, Extension Vegetable Specialist, and Pansy Brydon for supplying freshly harvested vegetables for this

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Charles F. Forney and Michael A. Jordan

59 POSTER SESSION 5 Postharvest Physiology/Vegetable Crops

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Jianping Ren, James R. McFerson, Rugang Li, Stephen Kresovich and Warren F. Lamboy

Fifty-two germplasm accessions of Chinese vegetable brassicas were analyzed using 112 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The array of material examined spanned a wide range of morphological, geographic, and genetic diversity, and included 30 accessions of Brassica rapa L. (Chinese cabbage, pakchoi, turnip, and broccoletto), 18 accessions of B. juncea (L.) Czern. (leaf, stem, and root mustards), and four accessions of B. oleracea L. ssp. alboglabra (Chinese kale). The RAPD markers unambiguously identified all 52 accessions. Nei-Li similarities were computed and used in unweighed pair group method using arithmetic means (UPGMA) cluster analyses. Accessions and subspecies were clustered into groups corresponding to the three species, but some accessions of some subspecies were most closely related to accessions belonging to other subspecies. Values for Nei-Li similarities suggest that Chinese cabbage is more likely to have been produced by hybridization of turnip and pakchoi than as a selection from either turnip or pakchoi alone. RAPD markers are a fast, efficient method for diversity assessment in Chinese vegetable brassicas that complements techniques currently in use in genetic resources collections.

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Jianping Ren, Warren F. Lamboy, lames R. McFerson, Stephen Kresovich and Jianping Ren

171 ORAL SESSION 47 (Abstr. 331-338) Vegetables: RFLP and RAPD Analysis

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Jianping Ren and Michael H. Dickson

101 POSTER SESSION 3A (Abstr. 127–158) Breeding & Genetics–Vegetables

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Mark W. Farnham and Anthony P. Keinath

104 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 324–334) Breeding and Genetics–Vegetables I Disease and Insect Resistance)