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Decisions regarding the selection and care of trees on public lands often are delegated to public employees with limited knowledge of tree care. To provide a technical resource for the municipal employee, the Urban Forestry Notebook was developed through sponsorship by Puget Power (a major Pacific Northwest utility company), Washington State Department of Natural Resources, and the Center. The unique focus of this Notebook provided the municipal employee with information on the selection and care of 65 of the most important urban trees. It also can be used as a model by other communities who wish to improve the care of their urban trees by providing an informational resource for the public employee.

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Urban Horticulture is a new area of scientific horticulture concerned with functional uses of plants to maintain and improve urban environments. “Functional uses” means that plants are used not only for beauty and ornamentation, but also as screens against wind, headlights, and unpleasant views, to influence climate, perhaps to reduce noise and combat forms of air pollution, for essential food and variation in human diet, and to improve the human psyche in densely populated areas. The constituent audiences for urban horticulture are people who utilize plants, primarily in landscape situations, including landscape maintenance and parks personnel, landscape architects, arborists, highway planters, nursery contractors, members of plant societies, and amateur horticulturists.

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Rutgers Urban Gardening (RUG) has established a physical, psychological, and emotional environment that fosters and sustains diversity. RUG enhances cultural diversity by employing an ethnic minority work force of six, reaching diverse audiences representing more than 30 ethnic groups, and offering a wide variety of educational programs. Urban gardening gives people an opportunity to meet others, share concerns, and solve problems together. It cuts across social, economic, cultural, and racial barriers, bringing together people of all ages and ethnic backgrounds.

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vegetables, berries, or even green plants has become less common with each generation, especially in urban areas and with a modern life style. Physical activities outdoors in the green environment, however, have been proven to improve mental health and

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interest in applying CEA practices to urban agriculture (UA), including small- (e.g., in-home production or indoor gardens), medium- (e.g., community gardens), or large-scale commercial operations [e.g., rooftop greenhouses or warehouse-based indoor “plant

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Urban areas started as complex social structures ≈10,000 years ago. Many of the earliest urban areas developed in arid climates near reliable fresh river water resources ( Redman, 1999 ). In the modern era, urban and suburban population growth has

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Urban areas in arid and semiarid regions continue to face water supply and demand challenges ( St. Hilaire et al., 2008 ). Some of the drivers of these challenges include accelerated population growth and enhanced economic activity of urban areas

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recharge, and moderating urban heat islands ( Cameron et al., 2012 ; Nowak et al., 2006 ; Pataki et al., 2011 ) are all ways that CH systems directly contribute to environmental sustainability. Systems and practices of CH also influence human health and

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Urban horticulture brings together what used to be widely separated: food production and urban space. In a broader sense, urban horticulture encompasses everything from small home and community gardens to city park management, rooftop and wall

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In South Korea, urban agriculture is defined as the cultivation of crops and ornamental plants, and the cultivation of insects and animals using various living spaces in urban areas ( Korea Ministry of Government Legislation, 2017 ). In the United

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