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yields of American slicer cucumbers, except Sweet Success, were lower. Consistently among the three sites, ‘Tasty Green’ Japanese cucumber had the lowest total yield among the evaluated cultivars. Averaged among cultivars, unmarketable fruit accounted for

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.05, means were separated using Tukey’s multiple comparison test. Data were pooled for all sites and years. Interactions among cultivar, site, and year were significant for all analyses. Results and discussion Marketable and unmarketable yields. The number of

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Rolling organic soil after plowing and drag disking resulted in significantly lower marketable yields, more forks (branching) and less stubbed (premature blunting resulting in an unmarketable root) carrots (Daucus carota L.) than not rolling. Using a rotary tiller before bedding had no significant effect on yield or other characteristics measured. Bed making with a tilrovator or bed shaper did not significantly affect yield, root length, number of forked, crooked or split carrot roots. Compaction, as measured with a penetrometer, did not have a linear relationship between the eight tillage treatments used in preparing beds and any of the root characteristics measured such as yield, length or number of misshapen roots.

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. Total yield of all unmarketable categories was greater for most TYLCV-R varieties/advanced breeding lines than the susceptible control ‘Florida 47’, except for FLA 8580, ‘Inbar’ and ‘Ofri’ ( Table 3 ). The most common types of defect among TYLCV

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A 2-year field study was conducted within the Sustainable Agriculture Farming Systems Project at the Univ. of California, Davis, to evaluate the effects of long-term conventional (CONV), low-input (LOW), and organic (ORG) production practices on processing tomato fruit mineral composition and quality. To establish relationships between soil chemical properties, soil water content, fruit mineral composition, and quality, this study characterized soil chemical properties and monitored soil water content through each tomato season. Soil total C, N, soluble P, exchangeable Ca, K,and Na were higher in the organic system than in the conventional system. Higher soil electrical conductivity was found in the CONV system compared to the other systems. Low input plots had soil characteristics intermediate to the other farming systems. Marketable and unmarketable yields were similar among the farming systems. Fruit N and Na were lower in the organic and low-input systems than in the conventional system. Fruit P and Ca contents were higher in the organic system than in the conventional system as a result of 11 years of manure applications. Soluble solids content, titrable acidity, color, and soluble solids yield were lower in 1998 in the organic system than in the conventional system, while no differences were found in 1999. Soil water content during the ripening stage was the major factor affecting the soluble solids content of the organic system. In the low input and conventional systems soluble solids content was most related to soil exchangeable Ca and EC, respectively.

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unmarketable and, in 2010, differences in unmarketable yields between cultivars were not detected ( Table 4 ). In 2011, ‘Bugle’ produced higher unmarketable yields in terms of number and weight and all other cultivars were not different from ‘Waltham Butternut

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on diversified vegetable farms and sold in the fresh market ( USDA, 2009 ). In 2008–09, 16 cultivars, including one standard, ‘Paladin’, were evaluated in the field and judged on yield characteristics. Evaluations were conducted in three locations

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this study were to determine high tunnel and grafting effects on plant growth characteristics and yield performance, including total and marketable yield components, and the characteristics that lead to unmarketability. Materials and methods Plant

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lesions on nearly the entire leaf surface throughout the plant. Yield data were converted to total seasonal production of marketable or unmarketable fruit per plant. The total unmarketable weight was used to calculate the percentage of unmarketable fruit

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associated with decreased head quality and reduced cabbage marketable yield (Peck, 1981). Overall, the results of N fertilizer studies have been shown to vary widely according to production system, weather conditions, and soil characteristics. Although recent

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