Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 59 items for :

  • undergraduate enrollment x
Clear All

Environmental Horticulture-undergraduate student enrollment at the University of Florida (UF) Gainesville campus decreased from 88 students in 1980/81 to 34 students in 1989/90. In 1983/84 a resident instruction program in Environmental Horticulture for placebound students was initiated by UF at the Ft. Lauderdale Research and Education Center. Enrollment rapidly increased from 6 students in 1984 to 67 students in 1989, with an average student credit load of 3.5 credits per semester. In 1990/91 increased student recruiting efforts were made with a common undergraduate handbook, recruiting brochure, and guides for academic program specializations developed to serve both locations. These efforts and others have increased enrollment at both sites. Currently there are 73 students in the Environmental Horticulture program at Gainesville and 87 students at Ft. Lauderdale. Students may begin their academic program at one location and transfer to the other site to complete their undergraduate requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science program in Environmental Horticulture will be initiated in the fall of 1994 in Milton, Florida, a small community in northwest Florida.

Free access

An important institutional issue at many large public and private universities is lack of classroom space due to the greatly increased student enrollment over the last 30 years. This continued growth of the learning community is expected to create

Full access

The Dept. of Agricultural Sciences currently offers degrees at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Undergraduate programs in Plant Science, Animal Science, and Rural Development were consolidated within the Dept. of Agricultural Sciences in the late 1980s due to the declining number of graduates. However, no personnel turnover or course changes occurred due to consolidation. Enrollment at the undergraduate level has doubled within the past 5 years. Student enrollment for Fall 1995 included 127 undergraduates and 31 graduate students. Graduation figures projected for 1995–96 include 26 undergraduates and 8 graduate students. Horticulture and Agronomy are now two of the concentrations available for the BS degree in Agricultural Sciences, and Plant Science is an option for the MS degree in Agricultural Sciences. Presently in the plant sciences there are approximately 30 undergraduates and 20 MS students. Faculty and professional staff affiliated with the Cooperative Agricultural Research Program are encouraged to submit teaching proposals to the 1890 Institution Capacity Building Grants Program, a USDA-funded competitive program for the agricultural sciences. Awards enable grantee institutions to attract more minority students into the agricultural sciences, expand institutional linkages, and strengthen education in targeted need areas. The Grants Program supports teaching projects related to curricula design, materials development, and faculty and student enhancement. Current teaching grants address graduate and undergraduate education in molecular biology and undergraduate education in soil sciences.

Free access

Abstract

Undergraduate interest in courses and curriculum in the agricultural sciences, including horticulture and plant and soil sciences (1), is at an all time high. Enrollment in agriculture in member institutions of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges more than doubled from 1963 to 19743. This paper describes changes that have been made in the Department of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Massachusetts to serve our students and provides a vehicle for future changes in undergraduate horticultural education. Hopefully, other departments will report on their undergraduate activities so that others may benefit from their experience.

Open Access
Author:

Nationwide, horticulture enrollments have fallen from the peak in the late 1970's. For instance, Stephen F. Austin State University enjoyed a maximum horticulture enrollment of 99 undergraduates in 1977. By fall 1990, that enrollment had fallen to 30. The absence of CADD (computer-assisted drafting or design) on SFASU's campus suggested an opportunity for horticulture to fill a void. This paper will discuss the decision-making process and costs involved in setting up a ten-station AutoCad lab with good plotting capability. A successful marketing effort has resulted in easy-to-fill sections with wide appeal across campus. CADD courses make sense in horticulture if the resource is not available in other departments, technical support is available, and the tool has value to related projects in the horticulture program.

Free access
Author:

While enrollment is dropping in many commodity-based curriculums, one key program area of interest to many students is sustainable agriculture. Some land-grant universities are initiating undergraduate and graduate programs, or concentrations in Sustainable Agriculture, to meet this student demand. Many smaller colleges (for example, Delaware Valley College, Slippery Rock Univ., and Warren Wilson College) are also offering a focus in this area as well. These programs often include an experiential learning component through internships and other hands-on activities. Examples of some of the courses being offered include Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture, Agricultural Ecosystems, Sustainable Agriculture Processes in Plant Horticulture and Animal Husbandry, and Fertility Considerations in Regenerative Agriculture. In this presentation, I summarize ongoing programs nationwide, and discuss the impact these programs are having on student enrollment.

Free access

The unprecedented, yet sustained, growth of undergraduate enrollment in the Department of Horticulture at Auburn University can be attributed to many factors, including an increased industry demand for horticulture graduates nationwide. Perhaps the basis of some of Auburn's growth, while appearing to be unique, may be of value in other programs. This paper chronicles the growth of the Auburn Department of Horticulture undergraduate program and highlights some of the traditional teaching methods employed within the department as well as some unique methods that contribute to the program. The paper offers ideas and practices that may be beneficial to other horticulture programs and may encourage teaching faculty at other institutions to publish similar departmental profiles that may prove beneficial to colleagues.

Full access

Abstract

At the University level, horticulture is one of the most dynamic fields in Agriculture. Undergraduate student enrollments, both for majors and nonmajors, have never been higher. The number of requests for graduate student assistantships are increasing. Extension personnel are under constant pressure from their clientele for more and more programs and information. The requirements for research have never been greater. In addition, with the democratic system which has been developed, scientists are spending more time on administrative matters than ever before. All of these points have their advantages and disadvantages but the time is past due for a detailed analysis of their impact on our programs by the individuals who are directly involved in carrying out the research, teaching, and extension functions. This is particularly true for those of us in the field of floriculture and ornamental horticulture.

Open Access

Floriculture, among the fastest-growing agricultural segments in New Mexico, is creating job opportunities for graduates. Limited faculty resources restrict growth in floriculture academic programs, particularly for curricular modernization, extracurricular activities, and capacity building of the student:industry relationship. Federal funding has provided a Program Coordinator to lead our floriculture academic programs, responsible for raising technical quality of floriculture courses, recruitment and retention of undergraduates, and establishment of regional alliances with industry to exploit job opportunities. During the first year of the program (2003), deliverable products included course modules, fund raising protocols, and public school workshops. Results demonstrate an affinity for students of Hispanic origin to the program (over 40% of enrollments). Industry support included over a 2-fold increase in 2003 horticultural internship placements, financial aid, and donations of expendable materials. Floriculture student participation in intra-campus governance and off-campus community service projects also defrayed program costs and resulted in institutional gain. Over 80% of the 25 students enrolled in the beginning floral design and floral crops judging class agreed or agreed strongly that they had an obligation to engage in fund raising efforts to strengthen the floriculture academic program. Our intent is to build the floriculture teaching program into a template that can be replicated into the future through sustained institutional commitment. The program can serve as a model for other academic departments seeking diversification of horticulture academic programs and recruitment of a diverse student body, but struggling with limited human resources.

Free access