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Eliezer S. Louzada, Hilda Sonia de Rio, Allison J. Abell, Gerson Peltz, and Michael W. Persans

in Hispanic students’ education 30 Jan. 2008 < http://www.acenet.edu/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home&CONTENTID=4226&TEMPLATE=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm > Banta, T.W. 2004 Assessing outcomes of undergraduate research programs Assess. Update 16 3 16 Bauer, K

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David Warfield and Dermot P. Coyne

Abstract

Transplanting is an ancient horticultural practice, which is a good thing because our profession is in need of a transplant—an attitude transplant! I was both encouraged and discouraged as I read Dermot P. Coyne's Presidential Address in the Oct. 1985 issue of HortScience 20:805–808. Encouraged, because he raised points that we need to address; discouraged, because he missed the starting point. Allow me to paraphrase an old saying: “Big grad students from little undergrads grow“. Let me lay it out in the open: I was shocked that our President finds no role for undergraduate education in tackling world hunger. I disagree!

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Mark E. Uchanski, Kulbhushan Grover, Dawn VanLeeuwen, and Ryan Goss

into an undergraduate general education plant science course can be an effective way to engage student learning. Units Literature cited Bosworth K. Hamilton S.J. 1994 Collaborative learning: Underlying processes and effective techniques. Jossey

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Suman Singha and Harry O. Kunkel

13 ORAL SESSION 2 (Abstr. 028–034) Education/Cross-commodity

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Donald N. Maynard and Everett R. Emino

Abstract

Undergraduate interest in courses and curriculum in the agricultural sciences, including horticulture and plant and soil sciences (1), is at an all time high. Enrollment in agriculture in member institutions of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges more than doubled from 1963 to 19743. This paper describes changes that have been made in the Department of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Massachusetts to serve our students and provides a vehicle for future changes in undergraduate horticultural education. Hopefully, other departments will report on their undergraduate activities so that others may benefit from their experience.

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Leo R. LaSota and Sheryl D. Soares

Abstract

The demands placed by institutions, departments, courses, and instructors on undergraduate horticulture majors have been justified as necessary to prepare students for careers in horticulture. This unanimity of general purpose is not paralleled by agreement on the specific means to achieve educational goals. Ballinger (2) questioned the adequacy of practical training for horticultural majors. Merritt (4) saw program innovation as lagging behind changing career requirements. Some (5) argue for greater standardization in horticulture education; others (6) oppose a rigid curriculum structure.

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Mark K. Mullinix and Paul Tvergyak

27 ORAL SESSION 9 (Abstr. 060-066) Education

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Rolston St. Hilaire, Theodore W. Sammis, and John G. Mexal

Introduction to Horticulture (HORT 100G) at New Mexico State University (NMSU) is a four credit hour, general education course that provides an introduction to the physical, biological, and chemical principles underlying plant growth and development

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Michael R. Evans, Todd J. Cavins, Jeff S. Kuehny, Richard L. Harkess, and Greer R. Lane

Economics and logistics have greatly reduced or eliminated the ability of horticulture instructors to use field trips or on-site visits as educational tools. This is especially problematic in the field of greenhouse management and controlled environment agriculture, since the facilities and technologies used are essential to the discipline. To address this problem, we developed 15 DVD-based virtual field trips (VFT's) that instructors may use to demonstrate to students the most up-to-date facilities, technologies, and management strategies used in greenhouse management (ornamental and food crops) and controlled environment agriculture (GCEA). Each VFT included a preface with background information about the company, a tour organized by subject chapters, self-examination, and a teacher's guide with additional information and case studies. Each land-grant institution with an instructional program in greenhouse management of controlled-environment agriculture will be provided a free copy of each VFT, which will benefit all instructors of GCEA in the United States.

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C.B. McKenney, D.L. Auld, M.J. Cepica, and J.B. Storey

100 ORAL SESSION 20 Abstr. 565–571) Cross-commodity: Undergraduate Education/Master Gardeners Tuesday, 25 July, 2:00–4:00 p.m