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2001 ). When turfgrass establishment is attempted, the available subsoil is often nutrient deficient, compacted, and not ideal for plant growth. Incorporation of materials such as leaf compost with a low soil-bulk density can add more air space

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to the loss of macropore space in the root zone, soon after turfgrass establishment occurs on sand-based root zones ( Carrow, 1996 ; Curtis and Pulis, 2001 , Davis et al., 1990 ; Duble, 1996 ; Habeck and Christians, 2000 ). Loss of macropore space

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germination and establishment of cowpea seeds coated with hydrophilic polymers compared with uncoated seeds, possibly as a result of lower oxygen levels surrounding the coated seeds. In 2006, a cornstarch coating was introduced for turfgrass seeds ( Arends

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Organic amendments, including municipal and animal sources of biosolids, can be applied to improve soil physical and chemical properties and turfgrass establishment, growth, and quality ( McCoy, 1998 ). Although the amendments contribute total and

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Topdressing or incorporation of large, volume-based rates of composted biosolids (CB) can increase storage of soil organic carbon (SOC), supply essential mineral nutrients, and enhance turfgrass coverage during sod establishment and regrowth

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allow for better success in the introduction of flowers not typically thought of as turf weeds. An ideal turfgrass species would maintain groundcover, but also allow for establishment and bloom of its forb companions. Some effort has been made into

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, this study was designed to examine the effects of three preplanting cultivation techniques and planting dates on WC establishment in two existing cool-season turfgrass lawn settings. Establishing procedures for consistent, successful establishment of WC

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Using composted biosolid waste as a soil amendment for turfgrass is becoming a common method for disposing of municipal waste. This study was conducted to evaluate turfgrass seed and sod establishment on subsoil amended with various rates of biosolid compost. To a soil that had its A-horizon removed, biosolid compost derived from sewage sludge was incorporated at rates of 0, 132, 270, and 402 yard3/acre. A fifth treatment included a single application of fertilizer at time of sowing. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) was seeded immediately after treatment application. The treatments were repeated on an adjacent area using kentucky bluegrass sod. For 1.5 years, turfgrass percent cover, color, density, and weeds were evaluated. Overall, the compost performed well as a soil amendment for turfgrass. A 2- to 3-inch depth of compost appeared to be the best incorporation rate for the soil and compost used in this study. High salinity and excessive ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) levels in the compost-amended soil at the time of establishment caused a 2- to 3-week delay in seed and sod establishment. After the 2 to 3 weeks, the compost-amended plots outperformed the one-time fertilized plots in turfgrass color and density. Turf managers may want to account for the delay in establishment when incorporating a 60-day-cured compost.

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establishing buffalograss from sprigs have been encountered, and there is very limited information regarding buffalograss sprig establishment in the turfgrass literature ( Shearman et al., 2004 ). Sprigging attempts by sod producers and researchers have

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1 Assistant Professor. Boehm.1@osu.edu Support for this project was provided by the USDA North Central IPM Grants Program and the Ohio Turfgrass Foundation. Salaries and research support provided by State and

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