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Yi-Chen Chen, Wei-Chun Chang, San-Tai Wang, and Shu-I Lin

methods have been developed for different vegetables, such as cleft grafting, tongue approach grafting, hole insertion grafting, and splice grafting ( Lee, 1994 ; Lee and Oda, 2010 ; Lee et al., 2010 ; Oda, 2007 ). Among these techniques, tube grafting

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Sarah A. Masterson, Megan M. Kennelly, Rhonda R. Janke, and Cary L. Rivard

, which is a significant barrier in the adoption of grafting in the United States. The most popular grafting method for tomato is the tube-grafting technique (also known as splice grafting or Japanese top grafting) due to its efficiency and simplicity

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Andrew L. Thomas, Jackie L. Harris, Elijah A. Bergmeier, and R. Keith Striegler

study: open, tube, carton, and fan treatments (left to right) (illustration by Linda S. Ellis). The advantages of grafting grapevines to rootstocks may include improved root disease, insect [especially phylloxera ( Daktulosphaira vitifoliae )] and

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Masayuki Oda, Kunihiko Okada, Hidekazu Sasaki, Shigeki Akazawa, and Masahiro Sei

Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) at the two-leaf stage were grafted on scarlet eggplant (Solanum integrifolium Poir.) by hand or a newly developed robot. The scion and rootstock were fixed with an elastic tube for hand grafting or with an adhesive and a hardener for robotic grafting. After acclimatization, the grafted plants were planted at the three- or 11-leaf stage in a glasshouse. Plants grafted by the robot showed a higher percentage of survival, and attained the three- and 11-leaf stages 8 days earlier on average than those grafted by hand. Stems were longer, and shoot fresh mass and fruit yield of plants were higher for the three-leaf-than for the 11-leaf-stage planting, irrespective of the grafting method. Such vigorous growth and high yield by robotic grafting were absent for the 11-leaf-stage planting but obvious for the three-leaf-stage planting.

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John L. Griffis Jr.

Surinam cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) has value as a minor tropical fruit crop and as an ornamental plant in tropical and subtropical regions. In the United States, Surinam cherry is propagated by seed, as stem cuttings do not root. Elite selections are propagated by grafting, but grafts have not had high rates of success. Micropropagation of Surinam cherry has also been mostly unsuccessful. In this trial, 100 seeds from a self-cross of the cultivar Zill Dark were surface-disinfested and placed in vitro in 150 × 25-mm tubes on a medium of deionized water solidified with 8 g/L of agar. Seed cultures were placed on unlighted shelves. After 3 weeks without lights, seed cultures were transferred to lighted shelves where they readily germinated (100%) over the next 7 to 14 days. Seedlings were strongly tap-rooted and the roots quickly reached the bottoms of the tubes. After the 2 weeks under lights, 2 mL of autoclaved, half-strength liquid McCown's Woody Plant Medium (WPM) were added to each tube, creating a two-phase culture environment. Every 4 weeks, another 2 mL of half-strength WPM liquid medium were added to the cultures. Most seedlings elongated and produced three or more stems nodes with leaves after 10 weeks under lights. After this 10-week growth period, several of the seedlings had also produced adventitious roots at the first, second, and third stem nodes. After an additional 4 weeks in culture, 50% of the seedlings (50) had produced adventitious roots at one or more nodes. Additionally, tip cuttings taken from some of the seedlings that did not initially produce adventitious roots, produced roots at nodes when the stems were inserted directly in WPM medium supplemented with 20 g/L sucrose and various auxins.

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Chieri Kubota, Michael A. McClure, Nancy Kokalis-Burelle, Michael G. Bausher, and Erin N. Rosskopf

. Grafted tomato seedling production and use. In most propagation operations in North America, grafting of tomato is accomplished by using an elastic plastic tube that holds the graft union cut at an angle (so-called ”tube grafting method”). Each plastic

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Ian A. Merwin, Rachel Byard, and Kirk W. Pomper

A pawpaw regional variety trial (PRVT) was established at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. in Apr. 1999 consisting of 28 commercially available pawpaw (Asimina triloba) varieties or advanced selections from the PawPaw Foundation (PPF; Frankfort, Ky.). Eight replicate trees of each selection, grafted onto seedling rootstocks, were planted in a randomized block design. The first two winters at the test planting site were unusually mild for the Finger Lakes region, with the lowest recorded temperatures above -16 °C (3.2 °F). Despite these mild winters, there was extensive winter mortality of some pawpaw varieties. Survival rates were >75% for 11 varieties, and were <40% for five other varieties. Poor establishment of grafted clonal pawpaws and insufficient pollination or fertilization of established pawpaws were important limitations of successful commercialization of this new fruit crop under conditions typical of upstate New York. Open mesh black plastic trunk guards provided adequate shade and protection for newly planted pawpaws, whereas translucent plastic tree-tubes caused heat stress and scorching of the young trees.

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Cary L. Rivard, Olha Sydorovych, Suzanne O'Connell, Mary M. Peet, and Frank J. Louws

plant sales ( Rivard and Louws, 2006 ). The most common tomato grafting technique for commercial propagation worldwide is tube grafting ( Oda, 1999 ; Rivard and Louws, 2006 ). This technique is highly effective and can be performed when the plants are

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Hira Singh, Pradeep Kumar, Sushila Chaudhari, and Menahem Edelstein

environmental conditions for proper healing and acclimatization are very important for the production of grafted plants ( Lee, 1994 ). The commonly used grafting methods in tomato are tube and cleft grafting ( Lee and Oda, 2003 ); however, tube grafting (also

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Sarah A. Masterson, Megan M. Kennelly, Rhonda R. Janke, and Cary L. Rivard

that had a history of soilborne disease epidemics. In all trials, a nongrafted control treatment was included as a standard comparison. All grafted treatments were grafted using the tube-grafting technique also known as splice grafting ( Bumgarner and