Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,735 items for :

  • tree nursery x
Clear All

Florida citrus nurseries produce more than 2 million trees annually ( Kessinger, 2005 ). Citrus trees were traditionally produced either in field nurseries (65% of total) or in greenhouses (35% of total). However, with the return of citrus canker

Full access

Bud death (necrosis) and shoot dieback in the spring decrease the salability and growth of nursery trees. Bud necrosis and shoot dieback of green ash occurs periodically in nursery trees in the Pacific northwestern United States (PNW), affecting as

Full access

3rd years after planting, which is an essential asset to help pay for increased tree numbers and establishment costs ( Robinson and Stiles, 1995 ). As the benefits of highly feathered trees were discovered, it became necessary to develop nursery

Free access

The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to indicate this fact. Trees and labor were

Full access

1 Horticulturist and Professor. 2 Agricultural Research Technologist III. We thank Bayer Environmental Science, Valent BioSciences, Van Well Nursery, the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission, and the Washington State Department of

Free access

occurs during the winter in nursery stock in the Pacific northwest region of the United States (PNW), especially on trees that are harvested and stored in coolers or in outdoor sawdust beds ( Erwin and Ribeiro, 1996 ; Pscheidt and Ocamb, 2002 ; Tidball

Full access

required to retard shoot growth in citrus nursery trees. This information could then be used in field studies to test the effects of gibberellin-biosynthesis inhibitors on rind color enhancement of citrus fruit. Materials and methods Plant material and site

Full access

shrinkage or decomposition of PTS (produced from delimbed pine trees) during a 4-month greenhouse trial and a 1-year nursery crop trial, and Fain et al. (2008b) reported less shrinkage of a PTS (produced from whole pine trees, including limbs and needles

Free access
Author:

Supplemental watering of shade trees in field production nurseries is needed, even in summer-rainfall climates, to achieve maximum growth. Scheduling the timing and amount of supplemental watering makes more efficient use of financial and water resources while maintaining maximum growth. Methods of scheduling supplemental watering based on uniform canopy and rooting in production agriculture must be modified, however, for shade trees in a production setting. Nursery trees are non-uniform in canopy and rooting compared to an agricultural crop. Applying the water budget method can be effective with sprinkler systems if tree water loss and rooting depth can be properly estimated. A measure of reference evapotranspiration and a species-specific multiplier are typically used to estimate water loss. Since species diversity in a field nursery is quite high, however, estimates of both tree transpiration and rooting depth must necessarily be simplified assumptions less accurate than for a uniform agricultural crop. If supplemental water is to be applied with drip irrigation, estimates of tree transpiration and soil water depletion need to be converted to volume units with information on total tree leaf area.

Free access

An experiment was carried out to determine when to initiate training potted rooted cuttings of olive (Olea europaea L.), so that tall and well developed nursery trees could be produced in an 8-month growing season. Initiating training to single shoot when average height of tallest shoots was 38 cm (15.0 inches) produced 1-m (3.28-ft) tall nursery trees in 7.5 months, with training restricted to the last 2.5 months. Taller plants [1.17 m (3.84 ft)] and some lateral shoots growing above 1 m were produced following another 0.5 month of growth. Five training months were needed to produce 1.43-m (4.69-ft) trees if training was initiated when main shoots were only 16 cm (6.3 inches). Initiating training at the beginning of the growing season did not produce significantly taller trees. Untrained plants only reached a height of 69 cm (27.2 inches) at the end of the test period.

Full access