Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 241 items for :

Clear All

Abstract

Turfgrass wear tests were conducted at Griffin, Ga. in 1985 and 1986 on ‘Tifway’ bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon × C. transvaalensis) using several golf car tire designs (tread configurations, radial or non-radial), golf cars, and traffic patterns. Wear damage to bermudagrass in all studies was assessed by visual turf quality, color, verdure, and leaf bruising. Golf car traffic caused significant wear damage regardless of golf car, tire design, or traffic pattern. Damage increased with frequency of trips over the site and with moderately sharp turns. Differences in wear injury between the tire designs did occur, but were minor in most instances. These differences could not be explained by tread pattern alone, since similar designs gave different degrees of wear. Whether the tire was radial or not did not influence turfgrass wear. Golf car type exhibited a minor effect on bermudagrass wear. Management alternatives to minimize turfgrass wear should concentrate on distributing traffic and avoiding sharp turns, while selection of pneumatic tire design or golf car is of minor relative importance.

Open Access

Medium- to low-end athletic field managers often struggle with maintaining high-quality athletic fields because of high use rates and limited budgets to supply enough inputs. Athletic field turfgrass must survive frequent and damaging foot traffic

Open Access

ease of establishment, wide mowing height tolerance range, tolerance to heat and traffic stress, and excellent recuperative capacity ( Christians 2011 ). Athletic field facilities are widespread in schools, communities, and colleges throughout the

Open Access

Bermudagrass ( Cynodon spp.) is the most widely used turfgrass species for athletic fields and golf courses in the southern and transition zones of the United States ( Beard 1973 ). The species are preferred because of excellent traffic tolerance

Open Access

Turfgrass traffic is defined as injury to a turfgrass caused by direct pressure, tearing, and scuffing on the tissues, which crushes the leaves, stems, and crowns in concentrated traffic areas ( Beard, 2005 ). Wear injury is evidenced by turfgrass

Free access

Water vapor condensation settling on turfgrass foliage becomes frost when temperatures approach 0 °C. Winter traffic, whether by foot, equipment, or animal, during periods of frost typically cause damage, leaving turfgrass discolored. Frost

Free access
Authors: and

Carrow, 2000 ; Lee et al., 2004 ; Marcum and Murdoch, 1990 ; Wiecko, 2003 ) compared with hybrid bermudagrass. Traffic is an abiotic stress placed on all turfgrasses that imposes two forms of damage: wear and soil compaction ( Carrow and Petrovic, 1992

Free access

Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and japanese zoysiagrass are commonly used for sports and recreational areas. Turfgrasses used for recreational areas are frequently subjected to traffic stress ( Bonos et al., 2001 ; Li and Hunt, 1997 ; Minner and

Full access

perform adequately under conditions of little or no supplemental irrigation, high traffic, no pesticides, and reduced fertility (≈49.0 kg·ha −1 nitrogen or less). Information about low-input golf course fairway turfgrasses is limited because most

Free access

they also need to meet the demands required of turf landscapes, such as recreational uses in home lawns, parks, or athletic fields. This includes the ability to withstand and maintain quality under wear and traffic conditions. Turfgrass traffic

Free access