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.1) kg·m –3 HL. Whereas these studies report the influence of lime/substrate pH on leaf tissue nutrient concentrations, Andrews and Hammer (2006) reported the influence of increasing limestone incorporation concentrations from 0 to 11.9 kg·m –3 DL or

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Agriculture, 2012 ). Unrooted cuttings received in the United States generally have tissue nutrient concentrations within published, recommended ranges on receipt ( Gibson et al., 2007 ; Santos et al., 2011a ). However, during the propagation phase of

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Abstract

Seedlings of ‘Babygold 5’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] were grown for 50 days in nutrient solutions with 0.4, 21, 42, 125, 250, 500 μm Mg. Magnesium deficiency symptoms were observed 19 days after initiation of the Mg treatments in the seedlings in 0.4 μm Mg solutions. The relative growth rate was significantly increased for the first increment of Mg concentration with no further increases at higher Mg concentrations. Increasing Mg in the nutrient solution significantly increased Mg concentration in the leaves, stems, and roots, but Mg tissue concentration decreased at all levels of Mg in the nutrient solution as physiological age increased. Visible Mg deficiency symptoms were observed on mature leaves at the 125 μm Mg treatment, but when the Mg concentration exceeded 250 μm, Mg concentration in mature leaves was increased above the threshold for appearance of Mg deficiency symptoms. No Mg deficiencies were observed on ‘Babygold 5’ seedlings when the Mg concentrations in the leaves exceeded 2000 μg/g dry weight and Mg uptake rate was 2.5 μmoles/g fresh wt./day.

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Correlations between the nutrient solution concentration and tissue content of micronutrients were determined for geranium, marigold and petunia. When nutrient solution contained 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 mM of boron (B), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo) and zinc (Zn), the tissue content of each microelement increased linearly with increasing levels of the same micronutrient in the fertilizer. Equations for these correlations were established for the six micronutrients used for each species. Increasing levels of micronutrients did not influence tissue macroelement contents. Increasing levels of one micronutrient had little influence on the accumulation of other micronutrients in the tissue. Plant toxicity symptoms developed when the leaf content of microelements increased to a level 5-10 times that of plants grown with the control (Hoagland) solution.

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). Several studies have examined tissue nutrient concentrations of leafy stem cuttings (henceforth referred to as “cuttings”) during vegetative propagation in nutrient-free media. Good and Tukey (1967) showed that P was mobilized from older leaves to lower

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were repeated with the same procedures described above with only anise and muhly grass, and with the omission of leaf tissue nutrient analysis. Sweetspire was omitted based on its lack of tolerance to NaCl concentrations applied in the first run; the

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Abstract

Pickling cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) were grown at high plant population (250,000 plants/ha) for once-over harvest. Nitrogen was applied preplant, 0 to 268 kg/ha, and sidedress, 0 to 112 kg/ha, from 2 N sources, NH4NO3 and urea. The effects of N fertilization practices on mineral nutrient composition of the tissue was studied. The concentration of NO3-N in leaf blade and petiole tissue rapidly decreased during the last 2 to 3 weeks before harvest (fruit sizing period). Preplant and sidedress N fertilizer applications led to increased tissue concentration of NO3-N and total N. Petiole tissue concentration less than 0.8% NO3-N or greater than 1.5% at harvest usually reflected reduced yields. Optimum yields generally occurred when blades contained 4 to 5% total N. The source of N fertilizer used had little influence on tissue concentration of NO3-N and total N. Nitrogen fertilization practices had a direct influence on the mineral nutrient composition of the leaf tissue at harvest. Tissue concentration of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn were higher in tissue that received preplant fertilizer N rates from 67 to 201 kg/ha compared to plants that received no preplant N, while the Na concn was reduced. Sidedressing N fertilizer had little influence on cation and anion accumulation in the tissue.

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and Plant Analysis Laboratory (STPAL), Baton Rouge, LA, for analysis for the following nutrients: N, P, potassium (K), calcium (Ca), Mg, copper (Cu), Mn, iron (Fe), boron (B), and zinc (Zn). Tissue N concentration was determined by using dry combustion

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Elemental deficiencies of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and B were induced in `Osaka White' ornamental cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. acephala L.) plants. Seedlings were planted in 4.7-L plastic containers and fertilized with a complete modified Hoagland's solution or this solution minus the element that was to be investigated. Plants were harvested for tissue analysis as well as dry weight when initial foliar symptoms were expressed and later under advanced deficiency symptoms. Root architecture was also recorded for the plants treated with the solutions. The containers were replicated three times for each of the two harvests and were randomized in a complete-block design. Deficiency symptoms for all treatments were observed within five weeks. The most dramatic expression of foliar symptoms occurred with N (a purplish tinge on underside of lower foliage leading to necrotic margins on the mature leaves), P (elongated internodes and a purplish tinge on underside of mature leaves), K (compact internodes with chlorotic lower foliage leading to necrotic patches on the leaf margins and blade), Fe (bright yellow upper foliage leading to a bleach white appearance), Ca (complete meristem necrosis with lower foliage becoming chlorotic then necrotic), and B (deformed young leaves and fully expanded leaves becoming thick, leathery, and brittle). The dry weight of plants treated with solutions not containing N, P, Ca, Fe, or B was significantly lower when compared to the control. Foliar tissue concentration data will assist plant tissue analysis laboratories in establishing foliar symptom standards for grower samples.

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). The sufficiency ranges that are reported are based on the general recommendations for whole-leaf nutrient concentration ( Jones and Mills, 1996 ), which recommend leaf sampling for tissue analysis in mid- or late summer ( Hoffmann et al., 2020

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