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Jinwook Lee, James P. Mattheis and David R. Rudell

susceptibilities to postharvest disorders, the objectives of this study were to determine if fruit storage temperature and 1-MCP treatment concentration impact the incidence and severity of ‘Royal Gala’ flesh breakdown and other physiological disorders as well as

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Jennifer R. DeEll and Geoffrey B. Lum

elevated CO 2 and chilling conditions, making them susceptible to certain physiological disorders in storage, including external CO 2 injury and flesh browning ( DeEll and Ehsani-Moghaddam, 2012 ; Fawbush et al., 2008 ; Watkins and Nock, 2012

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Jinwook Lee, James P. Mattheis and David R. Rudell

study was to investigate fruit size and 1-MCP treatment impacts on physical and physiological changes and the incidence of storage disorders such as senescent breakdown, stem-end browning, and cracking (splitting) in ‘Royal Gala’ apples stored in air at

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Yosef Al Shoffe and Christopher B. Watkins

Manipulation of storage temperature for horticultural crops is an important approach for reducing physiological disorders and maintaining quality ( Jackman et al., 1988 ; Lurie, 2002 ; Wang, 1993 ). Temperature manipulation involves using optimum

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Jennifer DeEll and Behrouz Ehsani-Moghaddam

treatments (1 and 2 d after harvest) on fruit quality and storage disorders in apples. ‘McIntosh’ and ‘Spartan’ apples were studied through long-term storage in air and CA. ‘McIntosh’ was also used to determine if two consecutive treatments of the label rate

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Jinwook Lee, In-Kyu Kang, Jacqueline F. Nock and Christopher B. Watkins

incidence of physiological disorders for ‘Fuji’ apple fruit during extended periods of 4 weeks at 20 °C and after long-term cold storage at 0.5 °C. ‘Fuji’ apples have distinctive fruit quality attributes in terms of fruit texture ( Costa et al., 2012

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Meng Li, Huanhuan Zhi and Yu Dong

Sweet cherry is a highly perishable fruit with a short storage life. Fruit firmness (FF) is an important quality trait that has an impact on storage potential, disorder resistance, and decay development ( Kappel et al., 1996 ). Poor appearance of

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C.L. Chu

Our study found that storage temperature, storage atmosphere and growing region interactively affect the probability of internal browning disorder in `McIntosh' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.). Higher incidence of internal browning occurred in apples stored for 6 months at 1 °C (34 °F) in controlled atmosphere (CA) with 2.5% O2 + 1.5% CO2 or in CA with 1.0% O2 + 0.5% CO2 than apples stored at 1 °C in air or stored at 3 °C (37 °F) in air or CA conditions. The magnitude of the incidence of internal browning varied among apples harvested from different growing regions. Apples from London, Ontario, Canada were less tolerant to these two storage conditions and therefore greater number of fruit developed internal browning than apples from other regions. In addition, apples from the London growing region and stored at 1 °C in CA with 1.0% O2 + 0.5% CO2 had greater probability of internal browning than apples stored at 1 °C in CA with 2.5% O2 + 1.5% CO2. However, there was no difference between these two CA storage conditions in causing internal browning among apples harvested from other three growing regions. Few apples showed internal browning when they were stored at 3 °C, no matter of what storage atmosphere was used. Therefore, internal browning disorder can be avoided or significantly reduced by storing apples at 3 instead of 1 °C, in these two CA conditions. Internal browning disorder will not be a risk if apples are stored in air at 1 or 3 °C.

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Christopher B. Watkins, Mustafa Erkan, Jacqueline F. Nock, Kevin A. Iungerman, Randolph M. Beaudry and Renae E. Moran

`Honeycrisp' is a new apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill. var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.] cultivar that has been planted extensively in North America, but the storage disorders soggy breakdown and soft scald have resulted in major fruit losses. The effects of harvest date and storage temperature on fruit quality and susceptibility of fruit to these disorders have been investigated in Michigan, New York, and Maine. Internal ethylene concentrations were variable over a wide range of harvest dates, and a rapid increase in autocatalytic ethylene production was not always apparent. The starch pattern index, soluble solids content, titratable acidity and firmness also appear to have limited use as harvest indices. Development of soggy breakdown and soft scald is associated with later harvest dates and storage of fruit at temperatures of 0 to 0.5 °C compared with higher storage temperatures. It is recommended that `Honeycrisp' be stored at 3 °C, although storage disorders still can occur at this temperature if fruit are harvested late. In addition, greasiness development may be worse at higher storage temperatures.

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H. John Elgar, Douglas M. Burmeister and Christopher B. Watkins

`Braeburn' apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) fruit can be susceptible to the development of an internal disorder called “`Braeburn' browning disorder” (BBD). Factors associated with development of this disorder were investigated. Susceptibility to injury was greater in fruit exposed to 2 or 5 kPa CO2 than to 0 kPa CO2 during storage. Susceptibility also increased with decreasing O2 partial pressure in the range of 5 to 1 kPa in the storage atmosphere. However, fruit stored in 1 kPa O2 remained firmer than those stored at higher partial pressures, regardless of CO2 level. BBD appeared to develop during the first 2 weeks of storage, and delays in air at 0 °C prior to controlled-atmosphere (CA) storage decreased incidence and severity of the disorder. The incidence of BBD was also reduced when the time to establish CA conditions was prolonged. We recommend that `Braeburn' apples be stored under CA conditions of ≤1.0 kPa CO2 and 3.0 kPa O2. Delayed application of CA for 2 weeks after fruit enter the coldstorage may also reduce development of BBD.