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Sandra M. Reed

The objectives of this study were to evaluate self-fertility and to determine the effectiveness of pollinations made over a 4-day period in Japanese snowbell, S. japonicum Sieb. & Zucc. Pollen germination and pollen tube growth were observed in stained styles following cross- and self-pollinations made from 1 day before to 2 days after anthesis. One month after pollination, fruit set averaged 40% in cross-pollinations and 14% in self-pollinations. Two months later, about one-third of the fruit resulting from cross-pollinations had aborted and only one fruit remained from the self-pollinations. This study demonstrated that stigmas of S. japonicum are receptive for at least 4 days and that flowers should be emasculated prior to making controlled cross-pollinations.

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Sandra M. Reed

The objectives of this study were to evaluate self-incompatibility in Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. and H. quercifolia Bartr. and to determine optimum time for pollination of these two species. Flowers from three genotypes of each species were collected 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 hours after cross- and self-pollination, stained with aniline blue and observed using a fluorescence microscope. In both species, pollen germination was observed on stigmas of over half of the flowers collected 4 to 72 hours after cross- or self-pollination. Differences in pollen tube length between cross- and self-pollinated flowers were noted from 8 to 72 hours after pollination in H. paniculata and from 24 to 72 hours after pollination in H. quercifolia. By 72 hours after pollination, most self-pollen tubes had only penetrated the top third of the style but cross-pollen tubes had grown to the base of the style and entered 40% to 60% of the ovules. Stigmas of H. paniculata were receptive to pollen from anthesis to 5 days after anthesis, while stigmas of H. quercifolia were receptive from 1 to 5 days after anthesis. This study provides evidence of a gametophytic self-incompatibility system in H. paniculata and H. quercifolia. Occasional self-seed set previously observed in these species was theorized to have been due to pseudo-self compatibility.

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Carrie A. Radcliffe, James M. Affolter and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

flower development, controlled pollination, and phenology studies. The objectives of the work described in this current study are to define and characterize the floral developmental stages in georgia plume, investigate stigma receptivity and anther

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Esteban A. Herrera

Abbreviations: DASR, days after stigma receptivity IPMS, in plane to the middle septum; IPMSE, in plane to the middle septum extension; RAMS, at right angles to the middle septum. New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Article 1236. The

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Hazel Y. Wetzstein and S. Edward Law

-flowing liquid mantles engulfing stigmatic cells. In addition, stigmas can be classified by the location of the receptive surface, the degree of papillate cell development, and characteristics of the papillae such as cell number and degree of branching. Heslop

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Chun-Qing Sun, Zhi-Hu Ma, Guo-Sheng Sun, Zhong-Liang Dai, Nian-jun Teng and Yue-Ping Pan

and HF was mainly attributable to embryo abortion. However, the mechanisms involved in low stigma receptivity and embryo abortion remain unknown, and further studies are required to better understand these factors in water lily cultivars. Literature

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Viviane de Oliveira Souza, Margarete Magalhães Souza, Alex-Alan Furtado de Almeida, Joedson Pinto Barroso, Alexandre Pio Viana and Cláusio Antônio Ferreira de Melo

controlled pollination, detailed investigations are performed such as the number of PGs per anther, PG viability, stigma receptivity, and pollen tube growth ( Cruden and Miller-Ward, 1981 ). Pre-breeding involves identifying characteristics and genes of

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Alisha L. Ruple, John R. Clark and M. Elena Garcia

), Fayetteville, AR (lat. 36°5″47′ N, long. 94°10″29′ W). Four elements of fertility [pollen viability, pollen germination, stigma receptivity, and pollen tube growth (increase in length down style)] were evaluated on six PF genotypes: ‘Prime-Jim’®, ‘Prime

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Michele A. Stanton, Joseph C. Scheerens, Richard C. Funt and John R. Clark

receptivity ( Galen and Plowright, 1987 ). Individual flowers were tested every 24 h until stigmas stopped indicating receptivity or until stigmas visibly senesced, as evidenced by a withering of the stigma and style. Flowers were hand-pollinated to

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Chunqing Sun, Zhihu Ma, Zhenchao Zhang, Guosheng Sun and Zhongliang Dai

studies, we set out to systematically study the reproductive processes in three interspecific crosses between a hardy water lily and three tropical water lily species, including pollen viability, pollen tube behavior on stigmas, and embryo development. The