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W. Garrett Owen, Alyssa Hilligoss, and Roberto G. Lopez

random from each block to determine the following quality measurements: stem length and caliper, and flower number, length, and width. Stem marketability was determined by length (greater than 30 cm) and flower quality (no visual defects). Stems shorter

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Alicain S. Carlson and John M. Dole

recorded hourly for the duration of the experiment. Stem length, caliper (measured ≈5 cm below the bottom floret), and anthesis date were recorded. Only marketable stems were harvested. A stem was considered marketable when the length was greater than 30 cm

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Christopher J. Currey, Veronica A. Hutchinson, and Roberto G. Lopez

high-quality rooted cuttings by maximizing root growth, total mass, root-to-shoot mass ratio, and stem caliper while minimizing production time and stem elongation ( Lopez and Runkle, 2008 ; Pramuk and Runkle, 2005 ). To meet the spring and early

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Wesley C. Randall and Roberto G. Lopez

length (measured from the base of the hypocotyl to the shoot apical meristem) and stem caliper above the lowest leaf with a digital caliper (digiMax; Wiha, Schonach, Germany). Relative chlorophyll content was measured with a SPAD meter (SPAD-502; Konica

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Brandon M. Miller and William R. Graves

, number of taproot branches, stem height, stem caliper, and number of fibrous first-order lateral roots were quantified. Data were collected by removal of the containers and placement of plants in large buckets filled with tap water. Once saturated

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Kaitlyn M. McBride, Richard J. Henny, Terri A. Mellich, and Jianjun Chen

collections consisted of canopy height and widths (the widest canopy width and the width perpendicular to the widest width), the largest leaf length and width, stem caliper at the soil line, final weekly flower number, root and top dry weights, and visual

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Timothy K. Broschat

per week thereafter. An area of ≈1 m 2 was maintained weed-free using glyphosate. Trees were not pruned, but were staked to encourage a central leader. All trees were measured for total height and stem caliper at 30 cm above the ground at the time of

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Peter J. Zale, Daniel K. Struve, Pablo Jourdan, and David M. Francis

abundant flowering; and second, a single-stemmed small tree with a mature size of 3 to 4 m tall and 2 to 3 m wide and with abundant flowering. Ideally forms would be evergreen, hardy to USDA plant hardiness zone 5, adaptable to various soil types, easily

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Joshua K. Craver, Jennifer K. Boldt, and Roberto G. Lopez

) and stem caliper [mm; measured above the lowest leaf with a digital caliper (digiMax; Wiha, Schonach, Germany)]. Leaf area (cm 2 ) was recorded using a leaf area meter (LI-3100; LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE) by removing the seedling leaves at the axil

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Joshua K. Craver, Jennifer K. Boldt, and Roberto G. Lopez

length (measured from the base of the hypocotyl to the shoot apical meristem), stem caliper [measured above the lowest leaf with a digital caliper (digiMax; Wiha, Schonach, Germany)], and total number of nodes. Leaf area (LA) was collected using a LA