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Po-Hung Wu and Doris C.N. Chang

objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using BA in the regulation of phalaenopsis flowering to increase the spiking percentage, the spike, and flower count of phalaenopsis. Materials and methods Expt. 1: Effect of ba on spiking

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Yin-Tung Wang

plants when given high percentages of NH 4 -N. Spiking (the emergence of the potential flower stem) is associated with high sugar concentration in leaves after being exposed to inductive temperatures ( Lee and Lee, 1996 ). It may be possible that the

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Hadi Susilo, Ying-Chun Peng, and Yao-Chien Alex Chang

fertilizer N, applied before or after spiking, to the developing inflorescence and compare the relative contributions of fertilizer N absorbed during various stages of the vegetative period to the stored N pool. Materials and Methods Expt. 1: Absorption and

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Jiunn-Yan Hou, William B. Miller, and Yao-Chien Alex Chang

into five groups and subjected to SDS at a constant 20 °C for 0, 10, 20, 30, or 40 d. The first group (i.e., 0 d SDS) was not subjected to SDS and was directly sampled before SDS. After completion of each storage duration, the dry weight and percentage

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Carlma B. Bratcher, John M. Dole, and Janet C. Cole

The germination responses of wild blue indigo [Baptisia australis (L.) R. Br.], purple coneflower [Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench.], Maximilian sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani Schrad.), spike goldenrod (Solidago petiolaris Ait.), and Missouri ironweed (Vernonia missurica Raf.) seeds after 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 weeks of stratification at 5C were investigated. Seed viability was determined using triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining and germination based on the percentage of viable seeds. Germination percentage (GP) increased in all five species as weeks of stratification increased. Days to first germination and germination range (days from first to last germinating seed) decreased with increasing weeks of stratification, but the effect beyond 4 to 6 weeks was minimal. The number of weeks of stratification for maximum GP was 4 for purple coneflower, 6 for Maximilian sunflower, 8 for Missouri ironweed, and 10 for wild blue indigo and spike goldenrod.

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Carlma B. Bratcher, John M. Dole, and Janet C. Cole

The effect of cold on germination rate, percentage and range of five cut flowers was investigated: Baptisia australis (Wild Blue Indigo), Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower), Helianthus maximilianii (Maximillian Sunflower), Solidago petiolaris (Spike Goldenrod), and Vernonia missurica (lronweed). Viability was determined for the species using TTC staining and germination based on percent viable seed. Seeds were given 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 weeks of cold at 5°C. Increasing weeks of cold decreased days to germination in all five species, with Baptisia demonstrating the greatest effect. The germination percent increased as weeks of cold increased in all five species, but was most significant in Helianthus and Vernonia. Days from first to last germinating seed was significantly decreased in all five species as weeks of cold increased. Four weeks of cold was optimum for Echinacea and Vernonia, while optimum weeks of cold for Helianthus and Solidago was six weeks and Baptisia ten weeks.

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Yin-Tung Wang and Yao-Chien Alex Chang

. Plants receiving 50% or more NO 3 -N spiked earlier and had higher percentages of the plants that produced flowers ( Wang, 2008 ) ( Fig. 8 ). Nearly all of the plants in the bark mix produced flowers (91% for those receiving 100% NH 4 -N), whereas only 8

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James A. Schrader, Christopher J. Currey, Nicholas J. Flax, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

carbohydrate biomass. When considering these percentages on a scale of 1 million tons of plastic used per year, it is apparent that the potential for improving the sustainability of horticulture by adopting biopolymer containers is substantial. Along with the

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Sandra B. Wilson, Gary W. Knox, Keona L. Muller, Rosanna Freyre, and Zhanao Deng

scale from 1 to 5 in which 1 = no flowers or flower spikes; 2 = flower spikes visible, but no open flowers; 3 = one to several spikes with open flowers; 4 = many spikes with open flowers, average to good flowering; and 5 = abundant flowering, peak bloom

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Robert R. Tripepi, Mary W. George, K. Amanda Linskey, John E. Lloyd, and Jennifer L. Van Wagoner

trees receiving the compost treatment in 2002 had the highest changes for N concentrations followed by needles from trees receiving the fertilizer spike treatment, but the changes in foliar S percentage were similar for compost-treated and fertilizer