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Abstract

Cleome hasslerana Chod., a cross-pollinated species, has 5 corolla colors: violet, lilac, red, pink, and white. F1 and F2 progenies produced from crosses among the cultivars Helen Campbell Snow Crown, Cherry Queen, Pink Queen, and Violet Queen indicate that 3 loci with 2 alleles per locus control flower color. The allele W, for colored corolla, is dominant to w, for white corolla; R, for violet color, is dominant to r for red; and I, for dilute flower color, is dominant to i, determining intense flower color.

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whitefly B-biotype ( Bemisia tabaci ), green peach aphid ( Myzus persicae ), twospotted spider mite, western flower thrips, american serpentine leafminer ( Liriomyza trifolii ), and citrus mealybug ( Planococcus citri ) ( Brodsgaard and Albajes, 1999

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Cultivated gerbera daisies [Gerbera hybrida (G. jamesonii Bolus ex Adlam × G. viridifolia Schultz-Bip)] have several different flower types. They include single and crested cultivars that have normal florets with elliptical (ligulate) outer corolla lips and spider cultivars that have florets with laciniated (split) outer corolla lips appearing as several pointed lobes. The objective of this investigation was to determine the mode of inheritance of the major flower types of gerberas in the North Carolina State Univ. collection. The collection contained parents and four generations of progeny representing a wide range of single and crested cultivars and some spider cultivars. Genotypes of parents used in crosses were determined by testcrosses to single-flowered, ligulate floret cultivars similar in phenotype to the wild, parental gerbera species. Testcrosses indicated that the wild type was recessive to the crested and spider flower types and given the genotype crcrspsp. For each of the types, a series of crosses were made to produce PA, PB, F1, F2, BC1A, and BC1B progeny. Allelism was tested operationally by crossing genotypes in all possible combinations and observing single-gene-pair ratios. Linkage relationships among the crested and spider loci were tested using dihybrid crosses and testcrosses. Phenotypic segregation ratios suggested the presence of two dominant alleles, Crd and Cr, determining the enlarged disk and trans floret, male-sterile and enlarged trans floret, male-fertile crested types, respectively, and an unlinked dominant gene, Sp, determining the spider type. Dominance appeared to be incomplete due to the reduction of trans floret length in most Crdcr and Crcr heterozygotes compared to crested homozygotes and the appearance of the quasi-spider type (spider trans and disk florets and ligulate and/or slightly notched ray florets) among certain crested Spsp heterozygotes.

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Durations of ultrasound treatments were evaluated for efficacy in removing or destroying external pests of apples (Malus sylvestris var domestica). Egg hatch of codling moth (Cydia pomonella; Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), was inversely related to time of ultrasound exposure, although egg mortality was less than 60% after 45 min of treatment. Mortality of twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae; Acari: Tetranychidae), and western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis; Thysanoptera: Thripidae), was directly related to ultrasound durations; adding detergent to the ultrasound bath increased treatment efficacy. Ultrasound did not remove san jose scale (Quadraspidiotus perniciosus; Homoptera: Diaspididae), from the fruit surface. Ultrasound, which can be incorporated in the packing line, shows promise as a postharvest phytosanitation treatment against external pests.

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During greenhouse production in Spring 1995, conditioning treatments were applied to columbine (Aquilegia×hybrida Sims `McKana Giants'), New Guinea impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri Bull. `Antares'), marigold (Tagetes erecta L. `Little Devil Mix') and ageratum (Ageratum houstonianum Mill. `Blue Puffs') plants. Treatments included: mechanical conditioning (brushing 40 strokes twice daily); moisture stress conditioning (MSC) (wilting for ≈2 hours per day); undisturbed ebb-and-flow irrigation; overhead irrigation; high (500 mg·L-1 N) or low (50 mg·L-1 N) 3×/week N fertilizer regimes; daminozide (5000 mg·L-1); or paclobutrazol (30, 45, or 180 mg·L-1). One week after initiation of treatments, individual plants in separate greenhouses were inoculated with two adult green peach aphids (Myzus persicae Sulzer) or five two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch). A natural infestation of western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) in the mite-inoculated greenhouse provided an additional insect treatment. Brushing was the only treatment that consistently reduced thrips and mite populations. Aphid populations were lower on low-N than on high-N plants, but thrips and mite populations were not consistently affected by plant fertilization. Moisture stress conditioning tended to increase aphid populations on New Guinea impatiens and marigold, but had little effect on spider mite or thrips populations. Ebb-and-flow irrigation reduced the mite population on ageratum relative to that on overhead irrigated (control) plants. Plant growth regulators did not consistently affect pest populations. Chemical names used: butane-dioic acid mono(2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide); β-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-α-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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the moist, wooded slopes of eastern China ( Hsu et al., 1994 ; Ji and Meerow, 2000 ). Because of the special flower shape and flowering biological habit, in English they have common names such as Spider Lily, Surprise Lily, Hurricane Lily, and Magic

Open Access

Non-SO2-fumigated `Thompson Seedless' table grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) were stored at 5 or 20 °C for 6 and 4.5 days, respectively, in air or one of four insecticidal controlled atmospheres (ICA); 0.5% O2 + 35% CO2; 0.5% O2 + 45% CO2; 0.5% O2 + 55% CO2; or 100% CO2. The fruit were evaluated for weight loss, berry firmness, soluble solids concentration (SSC), titratable acidity, berry shattering, rachis browning, berry browning, and volatiles (acetaldehyde and ethanol). Fruit quality was not affected at 5 °C with the exception of greater rachis browning in fruit treated with 0.5% O2 + 45% CO2. At 20 °C, ICA treatments maintained greener rachis compared to the air control; however, SSC was reduced in the fruit treated with 55% and 100% CO2. At both temperatures, ICA induced the production of high levels of acetaldehyde and ethanol. Ethanol concentrations were two-thirds lower at 5 °C than at 20 °C. Consumer preference was negatively affected by some ICA treatments for grapes kept at 20 °C, but not by any of the treatments at 5 °C. Preliminary data for mortality of omnivorous leafroller pupae (Platynota stultana Walshingham), western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande) adults and larvae, and pacific spider mite (Tetranychus pacificus McGregor) adults and larvae indicate that many of the ICA treatments would provide significant insect control.

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This research focused on the influence of insecticides on plant growth, gas exchange, rate of flowering, and chlorophyll content of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev cv. Charm) grown according to recommended procedures for pot plant production. Five insecticides were applied at recommended concentrations at three different frequencies: weekly (7 days), bi-weekly (14 days), or monthly (28 days). A separate treatment was applied weekly at 4× the recommended concentration. Insecticides used were: acephate (Orthene®) Turf, Tree & Ornamental Spray 97), bifenthrin (Talstar®) Flowable), endosulfan (Thiodan®) 50 WP), imidacloprid (Marathon®) II), and spinosad (Conserve®) SC). Phytotoxicity occurred in the form of leaf burn on all acephate treatments, with the greatest damage occurring at the 4× concentration. Photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were influenced primarily by the degree of aphid and/or spider mite infestation—except for acephate and endosulfan treatments (weekly and 4×), which had reduced photosynthesis with minimal insect infestations. Plants receiving imadacloprid monthly had the greatest leaf dry mass (DM). Plants treated with acephate had lower leaf and stem DM with bi-weekly and 4× treatments. Spinosad treatments at recommended concentrations had reduced stem DM, in part due to aphid infestations. The flower DM was not significantly different among treatments. There were treatment differences in chlorophyll content as measured with a SPAD-502 portable chlorophyll meter.

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Application of entomopathogenic fungi by inundative releases has been attempted for control of a wide range of insect pests, with generally poor results. This is largely because entomopathogens are often treated as direct substitutes for chemical insecticides and applied without an adequate knowledge of their interactions with the local environment. Humidity of greater than 90% RH has long been regarded as the a critical condition for germination and infection by the spores. With both temperature and humidity controlled, greenhouse crops offer an excellent potential for pest control using entomopathogens. The long-term maintenance of >90% RH, however, is not standard practice in greenhouse production. This study explored the possibility of improving the efficacy of the fungi by temporarily changing greenhouse humidity without adversely affecting crop growth. The study included laboratory and greenhouse trials. In laboratory trials, four humidity levels of 75%, 80%, 89%, and 97.5% RH were evaluated over a 48-h period. Three commercial products of Beauveria bassiana were evaluated (Naturalis-O, Botanigard 22 WP, and Botanigard ES). Greenhouse pests of green peach aphid, melon aphid, western flower thrips, whitefly, and two-spotted spider mite were used as target insects. The infection rate of B. bassiana was found to increase when the sprayed adult insects were exposed to higher humidity levels with the maximum infection obtained at 97.5% RH. Percent infection and difference between humidity levels, however, were formulation- and host-dependent. The highest overall control efficacy was obtained by using Botanigard ES. Botanigard ES was highly effective to adult green peach aphid, melon aphid, and greenhouse whitefly at high humidities. Effects of B. bassiana against biological control agents for greenhouse vegetable crops were also evaluated. Greenhouse trials were conducted in two adjacent greenhouse compartment with high and low humidity conditions for 48 h, respectively, for selected pest insects to valid laboratory results.

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). Although pesticide mixtures are commonly used against aphids, whiteflies (Aleyrodidae), spider mites, and thrips (Thripidae), very few documented reports are associated with efficacy of mixtures on western flower thrips infesting potted flowering plants and

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