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Valtcho D. Jeliazkov (Zheljazkov)

Chemistry of Spices. V.A. Parthasarathy, B. Chempakam, and T.J. Zachariah. 2008. Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York. NY 10016. 400 pp. $190.00. Hardback, ISBN13: 9781845934057; ISBN10: 1845934059. Hardback, 400 pages Spices

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Lon Johnson

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean

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Paul W. Bosland and Danise Coon

University has released three green to red jalapeño cultivars with unique characteristics, such as mildness, phytophthora blight disease resistance, or large fruit size ( Bosland, 2010a , 2010b ; Votava and Bosland, 1998 ). ‘NuMex Lemon Spice’, ‘NuMex

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Bruce L. Dunn, Stephen Stanphill, and Carla Goad

pinched, unpinched, and Atrimmec applications on poinsettia ‘Orange Spice’, which shows limited lateral branching. Materials and Methods Rooted cuttings of poinsettia ‘Orange Spice’ were received from ParkSeed (Greenwood, SC) on 12 Aug. 2020. All

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Ildikó Hernádi, Zita Sasvári, Jana Albrechtová, Miroslav Vosátka, and Katalin Posta

paprika–spice pepper ( Capsicum annuum L. var. longum ), which is protected by the European Union as a national cultivar. It is traditionally cultivated in the Szeged and Kalocsa regions of Hungary ( Somogyi et al., 2000 ) and ≈28.6 t is annually

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J. Benton Storey

Tropical horticultural crops can be the spark that builds student interest in horticulture. They are a refreshing alternative to the temperate crops that most of our curricula are necessarily built around. Students who become familiar with production problems and opportunities between 30° north and south latitudes are better equipped to compete in the world economy. HORT 423 covers tropical ecology, soils, atmosphere, and many major crops. Beverage crops studied are cacao, coffee, and tea. Fruit and nut crops include bananas, mango, papaya, pineapple, dates, oil palm, coconut, macadamia, cashew, and Brazil nuts. Spices such as vanilla, black pepper, allspice, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia, and cloves are studied. Subsistence crops such as cassava, yam, taro, pigeon peas, chick peas, vegetable soy beans, and black beans round out an exciting semester that draws students. HORT 423 is a 3-hour-per-week lecture demonstration course supplemented with slides from the tropical countries. Many students simultaneously enroll in a 1-hour HORT 400 course that is taught during the 1-week spring break in a tropical country. Recent trips have been two each to Costa Rica and Guatemala. These study trips are gaining in popularity. For more information about HORT 423 consult the world wide web at http://http.tamu.edu:8000/~c963/a/h423main.html.

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Margaret D. Collins, Loide Mayer Wasmund, and Paul W. Bosland

An improved high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for analysis of capsaicinoids in dried Capsicum fruit powder, involving changes in extraction, mobile phase, flow rate, and excitation and emission spectra and resulting in reduced analysis time, increased sensitivity, and safety, is reported. Extraction of Capsicum fruit powder using acetonitrile proved to be the best capsaicinoid extractor in the shortest time interval. Solvents used for HPLC separation and quantification of capsaicinoids include methanol and water at 1 ml·min–1 flow rate. Instrument sensitivity is enhanced by altering the fluorescence detector excitation and emission wavelengths. Two analytical methods have been developed. One method determines total amount of heat units in 7 minutes, while the other provides total amount of heat units as well as separation of all present major and minor capsaicinoids in 20 minutes. These improved techniques provide inexpensive and rapid methods for quantitative and qualitative analysis of capsaicinoids in Capsicum fruit samples along with good sensitivity and no interference or confounding peaks.

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Michael S. Uchneat, Kathryn Spicer, and Richard Craig

The objective of this study was to identify geranium cultivars that exhibit differential reactions to floral inoculation with Botrytis cinerea Per. ex. Fr. Sixty-two genotypes, including both cultivars and breeding lines, were evaluated from several Pelargonium species. Resistant genotypes included the diploid Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Herit. cultivar King of Balcon and the diploid Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bail. cultivar Ben Franklin, as well as the diploid Pelargonium peltatum accession 93-1-33 developed from an accession obtained from South Africa. Susceptible genotypes included the putative tetraploid Pelargonium peltatum cultivar Simone. Floral resistance was not correlated with foliar resistance. Diploid genotypes appeared to have greater resistance than tetraploid genotypes, and P. peltatum cultivars more resistance than P. ×hortorum cultivars. In addition, the association of petal number and resistance was investigated.

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William Reichert, Harna Patel, Christopher Mazzei, Chung-Heon Park, H. Rodolfo Juliani, and James E. Simon

Two new clonal oregano cultivars Origanum vulgare cv. Pierre and cv. Eli have been developed through multiyear and multisite evaluations, and have been approved by Rutgers University for commercial and public release. Each of these new cultivars have significantly greater essential oil and 2-methyl-5-propan-2-ylphenol (carvacrol) yields than the currently offered commercial alternatives. These two new cultivars were developed to provide good field performance, upright growth habit, to accumulate high essential oils yields and serve as rich sources of carvacrol. The cultivars were designed to supplement the flavor, food, fragrance, nutraceutical, cosmetic and animal and poultry industries. These two

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Manuel C. Palada and Stafford M.A. Crossm

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean