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clear signs of good quality. Among the most common ones are guarantees, trademarks, labels, legal responsibility, different forms of certification, etc. In fact, these are the instruments belonging to a company’s strategy for social responsibility

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and organizations use online social marketing programs and campaigns in an effort to reach consumers where they “live” online. However, as companies develop social media strategies, platforms such as YouTube (San Bruno, CA), Facebook (Menlo Park, CA

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modern Internet era has become crucial for these businesses. Characterized by a large user population, low cost, and ease of use, social media have become that substitute and have been increasingly adopted by florists for marketing their products

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extension: digital and social media, retail and marketing, and public gardens. Although the workshop focus was on millennials, youth outreach is also briefly discussed in the final section. Materials and methods On 23 July 2019, at the ASHS annual conference

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-based best landscape management practices and they have increasingly turned to innovative approaches to changing consumer behaviors ( Saurí, 2013 ). Extension professionals may incorporate principles of an underused behavior change strategy, social marketing

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.8%) shops chose to ignore city/county COVID-19 restrictions. Masks and social distancing rules were enacted at 31 shops (28.4%) that kept their storefronts open. I nnovative approaches to marketing retail florist businesses during the COVID-19

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, communication, and consumer education by horticulturists, but also a larger collaborative effort with nutritional and health scientists, marketing specialists, and social scientists. Although some efforts have been undertaken to increase vegetable and fruit

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The traditional content in introductory horticulture courses emphasizes plant structure, physiology, and production. At Illinois State Univ., however, the course work has been designed to meet University Studies requirements as well as departmental needs. The students taking the course are viewed as a market, and basic principles of marketing are used to gain and keep the interest of a wide variety of students, few of which have had any previous contact with horticulture. Extensive coverage is given to the historical, social, and economic status of horticulture in the United States. This nontraditional approach has been successful in the view of students and faculty. Postcourse surveys found that 98% of students felt that they had gained a good working knowledge of horticulture, and that 95% believed they would be a more knowledgeable consumer. Some departments use the University Studies program as a means of recruiting new majors, and this potential was not ignored in designing a marketing approach to the course content.

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Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption reduces risk factors for cancer, cardiovascular disease and a number of other diet-related chronic diseases. These foodstuffs contain relatively high levels of beneficial phytochemicals (plant-derived, biologically active compounds) among which the preventative activity of antioxidants are most well-known and well-documented. Since small fruit typically contain high levels of antioxidants, increasing their incorporation in the diet is a laudable goal. Media reports of medical studies pertaining to dietary intake and national education initiatives such as the USDA's Food Guide Pyramid and the 5 A Day—for Better Health program have successfully raised public awareness of the health benefits of increased fruit and vegetable consumption, but, as of yet, may not have altered dietary habits. The factors influencing food choice are complex and interrelated. They include: sensory preference, physiological factors (pre- and postingestion), age, gender, lifestyle, behavior, personality, education, income, social attitudes about diet and health, ethnicity and tradition, religious beliefs, social pressures, marketing pressures, available product information and knowledge (labeling, media coverage, etc.) or self-identity beliefs. Some of these factors offer opportunities for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption while others present challenges. With respect to small fruit, food choice factors that tend to increase consumption include public awareness of these products as being beneficial to health and longevity and their image as highly desirable, dessert-like commodities with exquisite flavors. The main factors that deter increased small fruit consumption include their relatively high price per serving and their relative perishability which affects cost, ease of transport and availability. Strategies to capitalize on small fruits' positive attributes and overcome negative attributes with respect to food choice include the application of innovative marketing strategies at all levels and the expansion of research efforts to optimize the health benefits and sensory quality of these products.

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Oral Session 33—Marketing and Economics Moderator: Elio Jovicich 21 July 2005, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Room 108

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