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Pineapple is normally propagated using crowns, slips ( Fig. 1A ), or, less commonly, shoots borne at any position on the plant stem (suckers). When pineapples are grown for processing (e.g., canning, fresh cut), there are sufficient crowns

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is propagated vegetatively using 25- to 35-cm stem cuttings known as slips ( Boudreaux et al., 2005 ). Wholesale production of sweetpotato slips is typically done in OF propagation beds, although sweetpotato growers in the colder temperate zones of

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costs can be attributed in part to the need for manual labor at planting. Sweetpotato is generally propagated using unrooted stem cuttings, called “slips,” and in the U.S. manual labor associated with planting slips is estimated to be between 15% and 20

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-Tape model 508-08-340; Rivulis, San Diego, CA)] was laid during bed shaping simultaneously with mulch. Slips of ‘Covington’ sweetpotato (Jones Family Farm, Bailey, NC) arrived on 7 June 2019 and were transplanted on the same day. Slips took 1 d longer in

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Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars, Carver, Potojam, Jewel and Centennial were evaluated for slip production, using topsoil, sawdust, sand and a general-purpose peat-based commercial growing media as bed covers. Temperature measured 2 inches (5.1 cm) below the surface of the hot bed varied with covers and date measured. Sand maintained the highest bed temperature, 77 °F (25.0 °C) at 0800 hr and 79 °F (26.1 °C) at 1400 hr, throughout the growing season. Peat-covered roots produced the maximum number of slips/plot (111), while roots covered with topsoil and sawdust produced comparable yields, 55 and 45 slips/plot, respectively. Slip production varied according to harvest date, with the third harvest producing the most slips/plot (83 and 153, in year 1 and year 2, respectively), which, was likely related to increased temperatures. Cultivar significantly influenced number of slips, length of slips, and number of roots per slip. `Potojam' was the most prolific slip producer for both early and mid season production under all bed covers.

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successfully in temperate regions, but only as a summer annual. In temperate regions, sweetpotato roots are stored over winter, bedded in early spring, and the sprouts from these roots, known as “slips,” are then used for propagation. Propagation of sweetpotato

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important component in the study. A sweetpotato crop is established with nonrooted cuttings (slips), which are vegetatively produced in field propagation beds. North Carolina growers use a wide (24 to 73 bu/1000 ft 2 ) range of seed root densities to produce

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biodegradable mulch that will at least partially decompose before harvest. Sweetpotato can be propagated by planting rooted cuttings or “plugs” instead of the more commonly used unrooted “slips.” Bornt (2012) in New York State and Novak et al. (2007) in

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Abstract

The internal atmosphere extracted from the basal 6 inches of sweet potato plants held for one minute at 48°C in tap water was higher in ethylene (C2H4) and oxygen (O2) and lower in carbon dioxide (CO2) than similar samples from untreated plant material. This increase in endogenous C2H4 content of treated sweet potato slips was accompanied by increases in respiration rate, early growth and total root yield at harvest. C2H4 content, respiration rate, early growth and yield appeared to be essentially quadratic functions of treatment time at 48°C. Maximum values for the above parameters occurred after treatment for 1 to 2 minutes at 48°C.

Open Access

Abstract

The common name for botanical varieties and cultivars of Cucumis melo L. is muskmelon. This term includes those forms with both edible and inedible fruits. In the United States the word “cantaloupe” has been applied to cultivars belonging to C. melo var. reticulatus Naud. The fruits of var. reticulatus are medium in size, the surface is netted, and has shallow vein tracts. The flesh is usually salmon colored, but it may vary from green to deep salmon-orange. The vines usually bear andromonoecious flowers, and the fruit generally separates from the stem when mature (slips). Most cultivars grown for commercial purposes in this country belong to C. melo var. reticulatus. The name “cantaloupe” has become firmly imbedded in American culture to indicate these medium-sized, netted melons found in season on shelves of nearly every grocery store and supermarket in the country. For this reason, little can be done to correct its usage except to point out that “cantaloupe” is a misnomer.

Open Access