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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

‘Twilight’ is a thornless, semi-erect, high-quality blackberry ( Rubus subg. Rubus Watson) that has very firm, large, dark, and sweet fruit suited for the fresh market; it ripens in the early midseason for a semi-erect type of blackberry

Open access

Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Gil Buller, Sedat Serçe, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

the German market Agr. Agric. Sci. Procedia 8 566 575 Finn, C.E. Strik, B.C. Yorgey, B.M. Peterson, M.E. Jones, P.A. Buller, G. Lee, J. Bassil, N.V. Martin, R.R. 2020 ‘Galaxy’ thornless semi-erect blackberry HortScience (In press) Finn, C.E. Yorgey, B

Free access

F. Takeda, B. C. Strik, and J. R. Clark

Western trailing blackberries (e.g., `Boysen' and `Marion') are grown in Oregon. USDA-released semi-erect thornless blackberries (e.g., `Chester Thornless') and erect, thorny blackberries (e.g., `Cherokee') from Arkansas are grown across the United States from the mid-Atlantic coast region to Oregon. Flower bud development in several blackberry cultivars growing at three sites (Arkansas, Oregon, and West Virginia) was studied. In buds of `Boysen' and `Marion' blackberries from Oregon, sepal primordia were first observed in September and November, respectively. Further floral bud development continued into January. Sepal development in `Cherokee' buds occurred in November in Oregon and in December in Arkansas. At all subsequent sampling dates, the development was more advanced in Oregon than in Arkansas. Buds of `Chester Thornless' blackberry from all three sites remained undifferentiated until spring. Preliminary findings indicated that the time of flower bud initiation varied considerably among the cultivars examined. The results suggest that floral bud development in blackberry, once initiated, is continuous, but periods of low temperature can arrest bud development.

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John R. Clark and James N. Moore

Yield and average berry weight were measured for first year fruiting (on semi-erect canes) and second year fruiting (erect canes) to compare harvest age effect for erect blackberries established from root cuttings. cultivars were `Cheyenne', `Choctaw', `Navaho' and `Shawnee' and 4 plantings were included in the comparison. One of the four plantings had an average yield of 27% more in the first year as compared to the second year. The other plantings had higher yields in the second year as compared to the first ranging up to a 100% increase. Yield was 23% higher for the second year when all plantings were averaged. Average yield increase by cultivar in the second year compared to the first was: 'Choctaw' 37%, 'Cheyenne' 27%, 'Navaho' 22% and 'Shawnee' 20%. Berry weight was not affected by harvest age except in one planting, where average weight was higher for first year fruiting.

Free access

John R. Clark

Eastern U.S. blackberries are heterogeneous tetraploids. Some traits have been quite difficult to improve, and the example of erect-caned, thornless cultivar development is a good example. Thornlessness was associated with semi-erect canes, poor seed germination, and other undesirable traits, thus extending the amount of time to achieve an erect-caned, thornless cultivar. The first release of this type was `Navaho' in 1989. Primocane fruiting is a trait that would not likely be considered intractable, but did not gain substantial attention until the late 1980s. Subsequent work in primocane fruiting has shown substantial progress in a relatively short time of breeding emphasis for this trait. Fruit size gains have been substantial, and even though this trait might be considered intractable, progress has been significant in the last 40 years. Excellent postharvest handling and flavor are additional traits which one might consider intractable. Substantial progress has been made in improving fruit quality for shipping, providing for an expansion in fruit shipped to distant markets. These and other improvements are expanding opportunities for blackberry growers worldwide.

Free access

Bernadine Strik, Juliet Mann, and Chad Finn

Twenty-one genotypes of blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus Watson) were evaluated for percent drupelet set in 1993 and eleven genotypes were evaluated in 1994. Commercial cultivars were chosen to represent types (trailing, erect, and semi-erect) of blackberries grown in the United States. Secondary fruit were picked when green but developing a red blush during the early- and late-ripening season. Drupelets and pistils per fruit were counted to calculate percent set. In 1994, ripe fruit ranging in size were harvested for `Boysen', `Marion', `Thornless Evergreen', and `Chester Thornless' and drupelet per fruit were counted. Drupelet set among genotypes ranged from 40% to 86% in 1993 and 39% to 78% in 1994. Most genotypes had a higher percent set on early flowers compared to later ones. Drupelet set and number were not correlated with fruit weight among genotypes. In `Boysen', `Marion', `Thornless Evergreen', and `Chester Thornless', drupelet number was correlated with fruit weight, although the relationship in `Chester Thornless' was not as strong as the others. It is unclear what factors limit drupelet set in the genotypes studied.

Full access

Bernadine C. Strik, John R. Clark, Chad E. Finn, and M. Pilar Bañados

enough for long-distance shipping. Still, there are a few cultivars of trailing blackberry that are relatively new and are suited for fresh market; ‘Siskiyou’ and ‘Obsidian’ are examples. Semi-erect. The cultivars ‘Thornfree’, ‘Loch Ness’, and ‘Chester

Free access

David Mettler and Harlene Hatterman-Valenti

://ndawn.ndsu.nodak.edu/ > Strang, J. Satanek, A. Bale, K. Snyder, J. Hart, C. Smigell, C. Slone, D. 2006 Evaluation of thornless semi-erect and erect blackberry varieties and training systems. New Crop Opportunities: Res. Rpt. 16 June 2018. < http://www2.ca

Open access

Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Brian M. Yorgey, Mary E. Peterson, Patrick A. Jones, Gil Buller, Jungmin Lee, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

Extension Service, Corvallis, OR Finn, C.E. Strik, B.C. Yorgey, B.M. Peterson, M.E. Jones, P.A. Buller, G. Serçe, S. Lee, J. Bassil, N.V. Martin, R.R. 2020 ‘Eclipse’ thornless semi-erect blackberry HortScience doi: 10.21273/HORTSCI114891-20 Finn, C.E. Strik

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Fumiomi Takeda and Jorge Soria

with fruit maturity range in cultivars of the semi-erect, tetraploid thornless blackberry HortScience 22 405 408 Takeda, F. Demchak, K. Warmund, M.R. Handley, D.T. Grube, R. Feldhake, C. 2008 Rowcovers improve winter survival and production of western