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education program. Recently, there has been resurgent interest in educational gardens, prompted in part by high-profile calls for a garden in every school ( Pollan, 2008 ) to foster an “edible education.” Although educators may support the use of school

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, quantitative information on programmatic effectiveness, program policies, program assessment, and student demographics are often less readily accessible. Much information and assistance is available for conducting assessment programs and analyzing assessment

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Florida currently has 26 state supported junior colleges and each campus is an autonomous unit which contributes to tremendous variability in administrative philosophy, curricula, and academic standards. All of these colleges have open door admission policies in that all graduates of high schools within the state are eligible for admission. Non-high school graduates may enter many community junior colleges to complete secondary educational programs.

Students wishing to transfer to the University of Florida as juniors must have completed an Associate of Arts (AA) Degree from a junior college with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better in academic courses based on a 4 point system of evaluation. They might enter without completing such a program provided they had been eligible to have entered the University of Florida as freshmen. The University of Florida requires 300 or higher score on the Florida 12th Grade Test, which usually limits eligibility to the top 2/5 ths of high school graduates in the state.

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A 17-week vocational horticulture curriculum was assessed for it's effectiveness in changing attitudes about personal success and job preparation, presenting horticulture/landscaping as an appropriate career, developing an attitude of appreciation and fostering of the environment, and strengthen social bonds to reduce delinquent behavior. Pre-tests/post-tests based on Hirsch's tests of social bond for juvenile delinquents were developed and administered to address attitudes toward school, teachers, peers, views, and the environment. A separate pre-post test dealt with career and aspirations. Results of these tests were compared to tests administered at a comparable urban program. Behavioral records for one semester before and semester during the horticulture curriculum were compared. Daily journals maintained by service learning students volunteers were analyzed for observational themes and combined with teachers observations. Success of the program was related to students desire and ability to get summer internships and/or employment in horticultural settings. Due to the limited size of the study group (6) and the school policies limiting follow-up data collection at 6 or 9 months, the results of the study must be seen as trends suggesting future research direction and supporting the continued work being conducted a Norfolk Botanic Gardens.

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Safety training for farm, nursery and landscape workers has been provided in Miami-Dade County in English and Spanish for many years. Vegetable workers are available August–September; nursery, landscape and tropical fruit workers all year. Certificates of Completion and proof of training cards are provided. Traditionally, a half-day rodeo was offered—instructors delivered presentations several times as participants move from room to room. 4 to 6 agents and 2 to 4 volunteers are needed to teach such training, plus 8 to 10 classrooms. 100+ vegetable and nursery workers participate. A local school was used for many years, with training scheduled when school was out. A tractor driving competition was held after lunch, with trophies and cash prizes. As scheduling the school became difficult, training was offered at the CES office using one room and 2 agents (Spanish in am, English in pm). This is easier to arrange and can be offered any time of year. In total, 40–50 nursery workers attend. A third type of training developed as topics were requested by the industries; for example, chainsaw and climbing safety for tree crews. One agent and one volunteer are required; 50 or more participate, and class is in English. Safety is also taught as part of other seminars, required by law (pesticide applicator training, Worker Protection Standard), trade organizations (landscape, nursery, arborist) or county policy (hurricane pruning for public employees). Participation varies widely (15 to 100+), as does language. We have concluded that successful safety training depends on being willing and able to offer the type of training required by a given situation, which will change over time.

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provide important implications for educational research translation into educational practice and policy. School gardening programs that have been evaluated to date are most often located in urban, public schools ( Azuma et al., 2001 ; Graham and

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the beginning of each school year, issue a policy statement to parents and indicate that they could register to be notified of pesticide applications and advised of emergency notification procedures; 4) each school to maintain a registry of parents

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Distance education is an area of rapid expansion in higher education today. Unfortunately, the development of distance education efforts, like all new programming, is fraught with numerous barriers. Frequently, technological advances precede internal policies necessary to support these activities, and because of the nature of distance education, concerns over expense, workload, intellectual property, conflict of interest and teaching methodology may impede progress. Funding distance education efforts also requires long-term vision and commitment. It is essential that a clear vision, including identification of existing needs and benefits, be developed before equipment and personnel are secured. Finally, some distance education efforts by their nature involve collaboration between other institutions of higher education. These schools may view participation in these programs as opportunities for their advancement or possible encroachment on their educational market. Establishing strong relationships is essential for ultimate success. At Texas Tech Univ., the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources along with the Dept. of Plant and Soil Science have committed to the development and implementation of distance education as an educational tool providing enrichment and access to high-quality programming for its on campus and place-bound students. Some of the success stories as well as the frustrations behind these efforts will be discussed.

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change public policy, whether warranted or not ( Millington and Wilson, 2014 ). Notably, some state and local governments have severely restricted or banned pesticide use on school grounds, public areas, and even home lawns ( Bachand and Gue, 2011 ; Hall

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participants, but as removed from classmate activity as possible. The testing room required an area for the researcher to be seated outside of direct participant vision. Specific school policies at all participating schools dictated that the researcher remain

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