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School grounds and athletic fields are an integral part of many students’ lives. Consistent exercise is a fundamental integral component contributing to the health of children ( Boreham and Riddoch, 2001 ). Therefore, athletic fields (and school

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pesticides on school grounds and athletic fields. In particular, some research has indicated that when children come into contact with pesticides on school grounds there is a potential for health risks associated with prolonged pesticide exposure ( Alarcon et

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included in this law are at an elevated risk for poor playing-surface quality ( Dest and Ebdon, 2011 ; Henderson et al., 2013 ; Miller and Henderson, 2012 ). The state of Connecticut banned pesticides on kindergarten–eighth grade (K-8) school grounds

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of school grounds has become a mounting point of concern because of the potential health impacts on citizens, particularly children, who may be exposed to the pesticides ( Alarcon et al., 2005 ; Gilden et al., 2012 ). Currently, there is no evidence

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The Allen Centennial Gardens are located at the Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison on the grounds of the National Historical site, the house of the first four deans of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The 2.5-acre garden, developed and managed primarily by the Dept. of Horticulture, replaced the old teaching and display garden space taken over in building additions. Within the past 10 years the grounds have been designed and transformed into a garden, with 26 individual collection gardens, including: turf, fruit and vegetable gardens, classic ornamental gardens (with both herbaceous and woody perennials), and a rock alpine garden. As it receives its finishing touches, an education plan is being developed to complement the education purpose of the garden; the goal of the garden is to become an active site for learning through both observation and interaction with the garden collections. The two main themes of the learning experience are: 1) the biology of the diverse and unique plant collections (including: culture, practices, and production), and 2) the aesthetics of the garden (the organization of space, form, topography, and color). Implementation of education programs will occur on the following four levels: first the university (first the horticulture department, second other departments and university functions); second, area high schools groups; third, community and professional groups; and fourth, elementary school groups. The education programs will include mapping, internships, classes, meetings, volunteerism, and tours. The Allen Centennial Gardens, with its education mission, has already and will continue to be a meeting grounds for the university community, and a meetings ground for both the professional community and Madison-area community.

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An organic gardening class was developed to provide nonhorticulture students an opportunity to become acquainted with horticultural science and the basics of gardening organically. The course was developed as a 3-hour (1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab), two-credit course taught in the fall semester using an organic gardening textbook. A major component of the lab is the development and maintenance of a small individual garden plot during the semester. Students grow their own plant materials, plant, fertilize, and monitor pests, and harvest at the end of the semester. The organic gardening class was taught for 7 years and evolved into having a mandatory service-learning component that supports service projects in the local community. Projects included working with the local farmers' market, supporting school projects such as growing plants, school grounds beautification, gardening, or mulching, and gleaning product from research and garden plots for the local food bank. The poster will provide information on the class syllabus and materials, record of service projects, and reflections of the students during and at the end of the class.

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The purpose of a service/learning project is two-fold: to gain skill in one's area of study and simultaneously to provide service to an unrelated community. This project provided such an educational opportunity for our Horticulture and Landscape Architecture students by providing the mechanism for them to develop and practice their skills of garden design, presentation, installation, and maintenance, while also providing a service to Oklahoma's fifth grade teachers and their students. Through their service, our students gained insight into the creation of public gardens, specifically ones for children. This project created a template through which elementary educators could then work with their communities to develop children's gardens at their schools. Our students presented gardening ideas via slides to fifth grade classes, geographically distributed throughout Oklahoma, and then surveyed them for their input into a garden designed for and by children. The survey accessed the needs and dreams of both the fifth grade students and their teachers. The children's and teachers' desires, as expressed in the surveys, were incorporated into garden designs by our students. A prototype of one of the children's gardens was then installed at the Oklahoma Gardening studio grounds with the help of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture students, OBGA Ambassadors (a group of horticulturally trained volunteers from the Greater Stillwater Community), and Oklahoma elementary school teachers, who sought to gain experience in garden installation in order to create a children's garden at their own schools. The processes, from conception through design and installation, and finally utilization for elementary education, were videotaped and incorporated into a “how-to” video and fact sheet, produced and made available through the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service (OCES).

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with desirable structure. The defects were presented through trees on school grounds for the experiential, outdoor-instructed classes, in which the specific defect could be clearly seen on a tree. The defects were presented through laminated images, 11

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protected area of the school grounds to reduce vandalism. Under the direction of LSU Coastal Roots Program staff, students provided the installation labor for their container yard. A 9 × 9-ft square was painted on the ground to mark where a 6-inch

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school grounds ( National Wildlife Federation, 2001 ). The SYHP curriculum was divided into two activity levels: kindergarten to grade 8, and grade 9 to grade 12. Applications were further subdivided into segments of grade levels to align with national

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