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The king oyster mushroom ( Pleurotus eryngii ) is classified as a white rot fungus capable of digesting lignocellulose ( Sharma and Arora, 2015 ). Currently, lignocellulosic materials such as sawdust obtained from various tree species are widely

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Abstract

Brickett isobutylidene diurea (IBDU), at 3.4 kg N/m3 in combination with either potassium muriate (KC1) or fritted potassium (K-frit) at 0.4 or 0.8 kg K/m3 in a sawdust-sphagnum peat medium, produced growth and visual quality in container-grown Juniperus horizontalis Moench cv. Plumosa Compacta equal to that of plants grown with weekly liquid fertilization (2.7 N and 2.2 g K/plant per week). Finer IBDU granules (ca 0.7 mm diameter) at either 1.7 or 3.4 kg N/m3 produced inferior quality plants and less seasonal growth. Tissue N remained fairly constant in 3.4-kg N/m3 brickett IBDU treatments throughout the season, but decreased steadily with both rates of fine granules. Tissue K was lower through the season with K-frit than with either a single (0.4-kg K/m3) or double (total 0.8-kg K/m3) application of K-muriate (KC1). Neither K rate nor source had a consistent effect on plant growth or quality over all sources and rates of IBDU.

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et al., 2009 ; Strik et al., 2017a , 2017b , 2019). In the early 2000s, common practice in the Pacific northwestern United States was to incorporate and mulch with douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii ] sawdust and to

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douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii ] sawdust, hand-pulling or hoeing weeds, and fertilizing with fish solubles as a source of N at rates of 100–140 kg·ha −1 for mature plants. Our long-term, certified organic research

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American Blueberry Council, unpublished). In the past, common practice was to mulch with douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] sawdust, which is readily available in the region but has become more expensive ( Julian et al., 2011 ). The

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Agriculture, 2019 ). Historically, most of the fields in these states were mulched with douglas fir sawdust. However, sawdust is becoming more expensive ( Julian et al., 2011 ), and many growers are using black, woven, polypropylene landscape groundcover

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tackifier (Granite Seed, North Lehi, UT), a shredded hardwood mulch {HW [derived from melaleuca trees ( Melaleuca quinquenervia ) (Forestry Resources, Fort Myers, FL)]}, HW + tackifier, pine sawdust + tackifier, a recycled waste-paper mulch slurry (PM), PM

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efficiency of 27%, 3%, and 7%, respectively, after the first year of establishment ( Bryla et al., 2012 ). Blueberry fields in the northwestern United States are most commonly mulched with douglas fir sawdust [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] or with

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In a 2-year study, the decomposition rates (changes in carbon to nitrogen ratio) of two kinds of sawdust used for blueberry production were determined. The effects of sawdust age and nitrogen application rates on carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N ratio) of two sawdust types were evaluated. When nitrogen was not applied, the C:N ratio in fresh and aged sawdust decreased 30% and 10% respectively over a 1-year period, indicating fresh sawdust decomposed faster than aged sawdust when used as a surface mulch. However, the C:N ratios between soils amended with aged and fresh sawdust were similar when no nitrogen was added, suggesting the age of sawdust does not affect the decomposition rate once the sawdust is incorporated into the soil. It was found that two nitrogen application rates (150 kg·ha-1 vs. 50 kg·ha-1) had an equal affect on the C:N ratio of both sawdust types. Nitrogen application had no affect on the C:N ratio of both sawdust types when both sawdust were used as soil amendments. Clearly, the decomposition rates of the sawdust were influenced by sawdust age and nitrogen application rates.

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A mixture of apple pomace and sawdust was tested as a substrate for production of shiitake [Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Pegler] and oyster mushroom [Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer and P. sajor-caju (Fr.) Sing.] on synthetic logs. MyCelia grew faster and more densely in logs containing apple pomace than in sawdust alone. Five shiitake isolates and two Pleurotus spp. produced higher fresh weights on a mixture of equal parts (by weight) of apple pomace and sawdust than on either substrate alone. An alternative substrate based on sawdust, millet (Panicum miliaceum L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), bran gave almost identical overall yield as pomace-sawdust medium, but there was a significant differential effect of the substrates on yield of the two tested shiitake isolates. Analyses and experiments in vitro suggested that optimal N levels provided by apple pomace account in part for its effectiveness.

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