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Andrew C. Bell and Mary M. Peet*

Environmental restoration of streams and wetlands in North Carolina is creating a growing demand for commercially available native plant material. Recent changes in the tobacco industry have resulted in decreased production leaving some tobacco greenhouses, once utilized for a few months, empty year-round. Identifying alternative crops that can be grown in tobacco greenhouses will provide valuable income to economically distressed tobacco growers. The floatation system (sub-irrigation) employed in the production of tobacco transplants in greenhouses is similar to that utilized by some native plant nurseries to produce wetland and riparian species. Local production of this plant material can enhance restoration project goals by increasing utilization of regional germplasm in this industry and reducing the risk of importing exotic pests with material shipped from out-of-state. To research these possibilities, we constructed a demonstration tobacco greenhouse with multiple float beds. Three commercially available media, including a tobacco seedling mixture, were tested. No differences were observed among the plants grown in different media. After one growing season, we have identified close to 20 species, woody and herbaceous, that can be successfully grown in a traditional tobacco greenhouse with minimal input or alternation to the structure or normal production practices. Additional research is needed, however, to address optimal production criteria.

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Thomas E. Marler

of threatened plant species and restoration of degraded habitats. The submissions have been published primarily in the “Propagation and Tissue Culture” or “Breeding, Cultivars, Rootstocks, and Germplasm Resources” categories, whereas many have

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Thomas L. Davenport

Pruning is an unavoidable necessity of virtually all arboreal fruit crops. In the tropics and subtropics, pruning of mango (Mangifera indica L.) is particularly important due to its tendency for frequent flushes, especially in humid tropics. Commercial orchards must maintain control of both tree size and orchard productivity in order to remain productive. Tip, formation, and severe pruning can be used in a variety of circumstances to produce predictable and useful results for a variety of purposes. For example, tip pruning can be used to encourage frequent flushing and branching of young trees to bring them into commercial production years earlier than if left alone. It can also stimulate timely flushes of lateral stems in an annual program to maintain tree size and prepare trees for synchronous flowering. Formation pruning shapes trees in an overgrown orchard to receive the maximum amount of light for high productivity and sets them up for annual pruning in a flowering management program. Severe pruning coupled with subsequent tip pruning of huge, nonproductive trees facilitates rapid restoration of orchard production. Each of these types of pruning can be used to get mango trees into production quickly and thereafter maintain maximum annual production while maintaining their desired size.

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Sergio Melgar and Michael J. Havey

one nuclear male-fertility-restoration locus ( Ms ) ( Jones and Clarke, 1943 ). Male-fertile plants possess normal (N) male-fertile cytoplasm or male-sterile (S) cytoplasm with a dominant allele at Ms . Male-sterile plants (S msms ) can be seed

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Edward W. Bush and Pamela B. Blanchard

participating schools conducted a year-round, ongoing nursery program during which they grew native Louisiana grasses and trees ( Table 1 ) that can be used by students in a hands-on restoration planting field trip 9 months later. Integrated with this hands

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Hsiang-I Lee and Michael J. Havey

because male fertility restoration is not necessary for bulb production. Historically, it has been time-consuming to select against dominant alleles at Ms from onion populations because male fertile plants must be testcrossed as males to male sterile

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Christine E.H. Coker, Gary Bachman, Chris Boyd, Pamela B. Blanchard, Ed Bush, and Mengmeng Gu

-going nursery program in which they grow native Louisiana grasses and trees that can be used by students in a hands-on restoration planting field trip 9 months later. Integrated with this hands-on aspect of the program, students learn about nursery maintenance

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Josiah Raymer, Mack Thetford, and Debbie L. Miller

rhizomes and roots when buried by sand and produces gently rounded dunes ( Craig, 1991 ). Although these growth characteristics make this species desirable for dune restoration, the availability of plants after storm events and timing of seed production in

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Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

Aquatic and wetland restoration and mitigation has become an increasingly important activity that improves ecosystem services and provides habitat for native flora and fauna ( Brix, 1994 ). This has created a growing market for wetland plants

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Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

Projects that focus on restoration, mitigation, and enhancement of aquatic and wetland regions provide valuable ecosystem services and habitat for native flora and fauna ( Brix, 1994 ). These projects call for a mixture of plant types and sizes to