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to better understand consumer attitudes and behavior during real and perceived drought, especially in terms of their landscape purchases and gardening/landscaping activities in different regions of the United States. Materials and Methods We developed

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). According to the Mobile Future Focus Report, Year 2011 proved to be a groundbreaking year for the mobile industry with consumers increasingly integrating mobile behaviors into their lifestyles. Mobile behaviors would include online search, purchase, and

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Face-to-face interviews of produce customers at Kings Super Markets in New Jersey yielded data on consumers' tastes and preferences, quantities purchased, and prices paid for fresh tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Purchase behavior indicated that during the local season, consumers preferred tomatoes grown in New Jersey to tomatoes from other origins. Data were fitted to demand equations to determine the factors affecting demand for fresh tomatoes. Tomato origin significantly influenced consumer purchases. Consumer perceptions of product characteristics such as color, freshness nutrition, and appearance do not appear to significantly influence tomato purchase patterns. However, prices of the) tomatoes or substitutes and income were important determinants of quantity purchased of both New Jersey grown and other tomatoes. New Jersey grown tomatoes were generally perceived to be of superior quality.

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Product behavior represents how consumers perceive and use a product. Its importance in predicting consumer buying behavior is well documented in marketing research. There are, however, no data available investigating the role of product behavior in the floral market. This study addressed this deficiency. Data were first analyzed using factor analysis to extract the principal determinants of product behavior in the floral market. As a result, six primary behavioral factors were identified and named as: “using flowers as daily essentials,” “perceived product value,” “negative attitude toward flowers,” “using flowers as gifts,” “eventbased usage,” and “experience in receiving flowers.” The effects of these extracted behavioral factors on consumer flower purchase frequency were then further investigated with multinomial logistic regression analysis. Analytical results revealed that behaviors “using flowers as daily essentials” and “using flowers as gifts” forced consumers to become heavy users in the floral market. Conversely, “negative attitude toward flowers” negatively affected the floral purchase frequency. Experimental results in this study also suggest that promoting a positive attitude toward flowers is essential in encouraging consumers to become flower users. The intended use of flower product purchase, whether for personal use or as gifts, was the main factor affecting the frequent purchasing of flowers.

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50.3% and 39.9%, respectively, of total respondents. Other reasons for which respondents preferred certain varieties versus others were appearance/color (20.3% of respondents), availability (19.6%), and familiarity (13.1%). Purchasing behavior for

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, and use that influence flower purchases in supermarkets. Behe and Wolnick (1991a) compared behavioral differences among floral consumers segmented on the basis of flower retail outlets and purchase volume. Behe and Wolnick (1991b) also determined

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ornamental plant industry ( Dennis and Behe 2007 ; Rihn et al. 2011). Age cohorts, unlike chronological age, better reflect the impact of life events on purchasing behavior ( Cheny et al. 2017 ). Baby Boomers, individuals born between 1946 and 1964 ( Fry 2020

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Consumers are not all alike, often having different attitudes and preferences. Their behavior also differs with regard to purchase and use of products ( Kotler and Armstrong, 2004 ). Groups of like-minded or similarly behaving consumers create

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been studied. This study addresses this knowledge gap using an online survey of 1200 CT consumers. Notably, we investigate the demographic characteristics and purchasing behaviors that drive preferences for purchasing pollinator-friendly plants at

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consumer behavior ( Ajzen, 1985 , 1991 ; Ajzen and Fishbein, 1980 ; Fishbein and Ajzen, 1975 ), general purchasing behavior, and, in particular, purchasing behavior related to organic food ( Gutman, 1982 ; Magistris and Gracia, 2008 ; Michaelidou and

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