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and Michigan is seventh. Therefore, there was not a strong association between the state of the Vegetable Publication Award recipients and a state’s value of vegetable production. However, there was some association between commodities that were the

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uniquely positioned to accomplish. It is hoped that this article will further stimulate research at botanic gardens and thus continue to advance the value and importance of public gardens. Historic research at botanic gardens Medicinal use of plants was the

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conferencing technology to draft a strategic plan. They developed a working definition of consumer horticulture and created a preliminary strategic plan. The plan included a mission statement, a group vision, core values, and seven goals, each with specific

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Extension to develop and distribute horticultural information; therefore, understanding the topics in which gardeners are most interested can help in developing timely publications and information that is of value to consumers. How do gardeners learn best

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; Dolan, 2009 ). Some of the earliest named apple cultivars originating in the United States were High Top Sweet, Roxbury Russet, and Rhode Island Greening, all dating from the early to mid-1600s ( Smith, 1971 ). In colonial times, apples were valued for

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additional attributes (publications with gardening tips and a plant guarantee) to already existing program features. Such effort will help strengthen the brand's position and value. Literature Cited Bruner G.C. II Hensel, P

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Abstract

Although the therapeutic value of gardening is an old concept, the present awareness of “horticultural therapy” as a special form of rehabilitation dates from the mid 1940‘s when institutions such as the Menninger Clinic and the New York University Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine were actively involved in therapy programs involving plant care and gardening. Horticultural therapy is thus a young field and its literature is diffused in publication of the medical, social, and agricultural sciences covering disciplines such as horticulture, psychology, education, medicine, sociology, nursing, and rehabilitation. This diversity presents special problems in tracking ongoing research and the literature in this field. The present study had 2 objectives: 1) to initiate a bibliography in horticultural therapy and 2) to compare various literature search techniques for their applicability in an interdisciplinary field.

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Foliar application of spray materials is an integral component of commercial citrus production. An intensive assessment of spray application practices has been stimulated by low fruit value and increased concern about potential surface water contamination in the Indian River citrus region of Florida. Many publications report research results regarding distribution of spray materials within orchards and off-target deposition, but interpretation is challenging because so many factors influence spray results, and integrating this information into practical recommendations is difficult. Canopy geometry and density are prominent factors contributing to variable deposition and spray drift. Environmental factors such as temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction also greatly influence spray deposition and drift, and substantial changes can occur within seconds. In addition the physical and/or mechanical set up of the sprayer interact significantly with the other factors. A better understanding of these interactions should help growers optimize spray effectiveness and efficiency while reducing potential off-target effects.

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Since the domestication of the first crop species, farmers have dealt with the problem of soil depletion and declining crop yields. Fallowing of land was the first approach to restoring soil fertility, and is still the most commonly used method among indigenous farmers. Alternatives to fallow, such as crop rotation and green manures, developed in a number of areas. The earliest record of their use is in Chinese writings from ca. 500 B.C. Discussion of these practices is found in European agricultural publications dating from the 16th century. While these ancient techniques have proven value for soil conservation, their use in modern agriculture is quite limited. Renewed interest within the agriculture community in recent decades has resulted in a greater research effort in the areas of green manures, cover crops, and living-mulch cropping systems.

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Kentucky State Univ. (KYSU) emphasizes research on developing alternative, high-value crops and sustainable agriculture methods for use by limited-resource farmers. Since 1990, KYSU has maintained a research program to develop pawpaw into a new high-value tree fruit crop. With its high tolerance for many native pests and diseases, pawpaw shows great potential as a crop for organic and sustainable production. The objectives of KYSU's pawpaw research program include: 1) variety trials; 2) development of new or improved methods of propagation; 3) collection, evaluation, preservation, and dissemination of germplasm; and 4) sharing of information on pawpaw with scientists, commercial growers and marketers, and the general public. To aid in dissemination of information on pawpaw, a web site has been developed (http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu) that includes information on current and past pawpaw research at KYSU and information on the PawPaw Foundation. On this site, there are a selected bibliography of publications on pawpaw and related species; pawpaw recipes and nutritional information; a guide to buying and growing pawpaws; photos of pawpaw trees, flowers and fruit; and links to other web sites with pawpaw information. In the future, the site will include results from the pawpaw regional variety trials and the database for the National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Asimina spp., located at KYSU. The pawpaw information web site will be an increasingly useful aid in the introduction of pawpaw as a new, potentially high-value, tree fruit crop.

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