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Mary Hockenberry Meyer, Stan Hokanson, Susan Galatowitsch, and James Luby

University public gardens offer a unique opportunity to showcase research in horticulture and plant science, as well as in diverse programs such as art, engineering, medicine, human nutrition, and information technology. Universities, especially

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Min Hyeong Kwon, Changwan Seo, Jongyun Kim, Moonil Kim, Chun Ho Pak, and Woo-Kyun Lee

, 2011 ; Louv, 2008 ; McMichael, 2001 ). As the issue of nature deficiency in urban areas has become more prominent, people have become interested in green spaces and access to natural environments. Urban public gardens provide environmental benefits to

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Aaron Steil and Robert E. Lyons

Public gardens evaluate a wide variety of internal activities, including job performance, fundraising, and education. As observed elsewhere, these evaluations can conjure up a preponderance of negative emotions, which, when coupled with other

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Matthew S. Lobdell

skilled professionals ( Rogers, 1993 ). Public gardens are one potential source for horticulture internship opportunities. Though public garden internships are often only loosely characterized or defined ( Hird et al., 2007 ), intern responsibilities

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Min Hyeong Kwon, Jongyun Kim, Changwan Seo, Chiwon W. Lee, Eu Jean Jang, and Woo-Kyun Lee

environmental experience-based learning programs that were offered by public gardens for exhibition, conservation, and education were believed to be the perfect laboratories for children to nurture a sense of scientific curiosity and understand the value of life

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Sarada Krishnan, Heather Kirk-Ballard, Esther McGinnis, and Lauren Garcia Chance

The National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture (NICH), a consortium of CH leaders from academia, industry, public gardens, governments, and nonprofits ( Dorn et al., 2018 ), defines CH as “the cultivation, use, and enjoyment of plants, gardens

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Esther McGinnis, Alicia Rihn, Natalie Bumgarner, Sarada Krishnan, Jourdan Cole, Casey Sclar, and Hayk Khachatryan

extension: digital and social media, retail and marketing, and public gardens. Although the workshop focus was on millennials, youth outreach is also briefly discussed in the final section. Materials and methods On 23 July 2019, at the ASHS annual conference

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Susan L. Hamilton and Kathleen DeMarrais

This study examined how avid gardeners experience a public garden. Phenomenological interviewing was used to collect data from six avid gardeners who frequently visited a public garden. Data about the gardeners' beliefs and actions regarding gardening history, gardening practices, and involvement with public gardens were gathered. From inductive analysis, a model of a gardener's world composed of four conceptual themes: 1) personal history, 2) social connections, 3) human well-being, and 4) learning experiences was delineated. The conceptual themes of a gardener's world are the personal learning constructs through which gardeners experience the plant world. Each of the four conceptual themes influenced how participants in this study experienced a public garden. Participants used a public garden to socially interact with others, enhance their human well-being, strengthen their gardening background, and extend their gardening knowledge and skill. Several subthemes emerged within the four conceptual themes of an avid gardener's world to inform us how gardening plays an integral role in gardeners' lives.

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Kathleen M. Kelley, James C. Sellmer, and Rebecca H. Robert

to how consumers view public gardens and arboreta as a resource and destination and how these spaces should structure events, activities, education, and entertainment to best coincide with consumer interests. Thus, public gardens and arboreta can

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Susan Wilson Hamilton

This study examined how avid gardeners experience a public garden. Phenomenological interviewing was the qualitative research method used to collect data from six avid gardeners who frequently visited a public garden. Data about the gardener's beliefs and actions regarding their gardening history, gardening practices, and involvement with public gardens were gathered. From an inductive analysis, a conceptual model of a gardener's world was delineated. This study found that a gardener's world is composed of four dimensions that include: 1) personal history, 2) social connections, 3) human well-being, and 4) learning experiences. The dimensions of a gardener's world are the personal learning constructs through which gardeners experience their plant world. It is through these dimensions that the avid gardeners in this study experienced a public garden. Each of the four dimensions of an avid gardener's composition influenced how participants experienced a public garden. Participants used a public garden to socially interact with others, enhance their human well-being, strengthen their gardening background, and extend their gardening knowledge and skill. Several categories of activities and events emerged within the four dimensions of an avid gardener's world to inform us how gardening plays an integral role in gardeners' lives.