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-endemic conditions in Florida ( Graham et al. 2020 ), it is critical to prevent C Las transmission to new plantings and keep them disease-free and productive. Individual protective covers (IPCs) are a type of psyllid exclusion tool designed to prevent the

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Qureshi, J.A. Stansly, P.A. 2007 Integrated approaches for managing the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Homoptera: Psyllidae) in Florida Proc. Annu. Meet. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 120 110 115 Qureshi, J.A. Stansly, P.A. 2009 Exclusion techniques

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exclusion techniques may keep pollinators out of the high tunnel as well. This may be problematic with insect-pollinated crops. Fig. 1. High tunnel with LS Econet B ground-to-ground screening (Gintec Shade Technologies, Birmingham, AL) (A) and traditional

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. Fig. 1. Protected fresh grapefruit cultivation system for asian citrus psyllid exclusion. (A) Passively ventilated structure with 1/4-acre (100 ft wide × 120 ft long × 14 ft tall). The service door is garage-style roll-up and measures 8 ft wide × 10 ft

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position of each screen house were fixed to the ground with two guy-wires and four earth anchors. Fig. 1. Protected fresh grapefruit cultivation system for asian citrus psyllid exclusion. At the center, four passively ventilated screen houses with 1/4-acre

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Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus ( C Las), which are transmitted to citrus trees by feeding of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) ( Halbert and Manjunath 2004 ). HLB symptoms include chlorosis and blotchy mottling of the leaves, deformed and poorly colored

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-producing areas, HLB is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus ( C Las) and spread by the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri ( Halbert and Manjunath 2004 ; Hall et al. 2013 ). The bacteria cause phloem collapse and

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in Florida is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, and it is vectored by the asian citrus psyllid. After the initial infection, many months may pass before typical blotchy mottle symptoms on the leave are evident. Trees affected by HLB

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transmitted by Asian citrus psyllids ( Diphorina citri ); it was found in Florida in 2005 ( Gottwald et al., 2007 ). Since the confirmation of HLB in Florida, the HLB incidence has rapidly increased from 0.2% in 2006 to essentially 100% at present ( Graham et

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