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fruit maturity. Preharvest dropped fruit are not only lost yield but also a potential reservoir for pests and diseases. Determining which cultivars are prone to PHFD would be important information for guiding harvest management. Relatively few

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-Cardwell, 2014 ; Iglesias et al., 2007 ). Increased preharvest fruit drop together with tree decline due to C Las infection results in a great reduction in yield and difficulty in field management of HLB-affected groves ( Albrigo and Stover, 2015 ; Bové, 2006

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drop of citrus ( Fig. 1 ) has become more severe ( Table 1 ). The USDA (2015) estimated preharvest fruit drop at 18% and 23% of the total crop for early-midseason (E-M) sweet orange cultivars (mainly Hamlin, Midsweet, and Pineapple) and 22% and 31

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(Cornish and Burgin, 2005; Tong et al., 2017). Hence, the main objective of the current study is to evaluate the potential of glyphosate in promoting preharvest fruit drop when applied in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange tree rows near the harvesting timeline. The

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; Gapper et al., 2006 ; Ju and Curry, 2000 ; Watkins et al., 1995 ; Whitaker and Solomos, 1997 ). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of preharvest treatments with 1-MCP on premature fruit drop, maturity changes before harvest

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Fruit abscission, or physiological drop of apple ( Malus × domestica Borkh.), occurs in multiple phases during growth and development. Preharvest fruit drop (PFD), which occurs with many commercially important apple cultivars, involves fruit

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complicated by uneven ripening, overlapping maturity of cultivars, and lack of labor availability. Exacerbating these complications is the tendency for apples to abscise prematurely before harvest [preharvest fruit drop (PFD)]. PFD can occur up to 4 weeks

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‘Delicious’ is one of the most important apple ( Malus × domestica Borkh.) cultivars grown in the United States. Excessive preharvest apple fruit drop, which occurs before fruit develop optimum red color, maturity, or size, is one of its faults

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Preharvest apple ( Malus × domestica Borkh.) fruit drop, which occurs before fruit develop optimum red color, maturity, or size, usually causes a serious economic loss. Conversely, picking fruit before adequate maturity may lead to poor

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Abstract

Five apple (Malus domestica) cultivars were treated with NAA at 10 mg·liter–1 and dichlorprop at 5, 10, and 15 mg·liter–1 during 2 years. Although the response varied with cultivar, NAA generally delayed fruit abscission compared to the control. Preharvest drop was usually reduced by dichlorprop at 5 mg·liter–1 more effectively than by NAA. Preharvest drop of ‘Stayman’, ‘Rome Beauty’, and ‘Winesap’, but not ‘Delicious’, was inversely related to concentration of dichlorprop. Fruit redness, flesh firmness, soluble solids content, and starch ratings were not affected consistently at harvest or during storage by any treatment for any cultivar. Residue levels of dichlorprop in the fruit were related to treatment concentration and persisted until harvest. Chemical names used: naphthalene acetic acid (NAA); 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (dichlorprop).

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