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R.G. Linderman and E.A. Davis

aerated-steam treatment experiment, as well as a sandy loam soil, was used for treatments with different rates of metam sodium. The potting medium was placed into 20 × 20-cm resealable polyethylene bags (600 cm 3 per bag) and was moistened with 200 mL of

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Haytham Z. Zaiter, Dermot P. Coyne, Ralph B. Clark, and James R. Steadman

Nine bean cultivars/lines were grown in a Tripp sandy-clay loam (high pH), a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (neutral pH), and a potting mix (equal volume of sand, soil [Sharpsburg silty clay loam], vermiculite and moss pest) (low pH) in greenhouse (one experiment), growth chamber (two experiments), and field (two experiments) in Lincoln, NE, in order to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska rust (Uromyces appendiculatus var. appendiculatus) isolate US85-NP-10-1. A factorial arrangement of soil media and cultivars/lines in a randomized complete block design was used in the greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, while a split-plot design (soil media as main plots and cultivars/lines as sub-plots) was used in the field experiments. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule size of cultivars/lines grown on the three different soil media. Plants grown on potting mix medium showed significant Increases in rust pustule size compared with Tripp (high pH) or Sharpsburg silty clay loam soils (neutral pH). A significant interaction occurred between soil media and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. A positive correlation (R= +0.5) was observed between the increased concentration of C1 and Mn,, and a negative correlation for lower K (R+ -0.44) and soil pH in the potting mix and larger rust pustule size of leaves. These results have implications for plant breeders and pathologists involved in evaluating bean progenies and lines for rust resistance.

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Haytham Z. Zaiter, Dermot P. Coyne, Ralph B. Clark, and James R. Steadman

Nine bean cultivars/lines were grown in a Tripp sandy-clay loam (high pH), a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (neutral pH), and a potting mix (equal volume of sand, soil [Sharpsburg silty clay loam], vermiculite and moss pest) (low pH) in greenhouse (one experiment), growth chamber (two experiments), and field (two experiments) in Lincoln, NE, in order to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska rust (Uromyces appendiculatus var. appendiculatus) isolate US85-NP-10-1. A factorial arrangement of soil media and cultivars/lines in a randomized complete block design was used in the greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, while a split-plot design (soil media as main plots and cultivars/lines as sub-plots) was used in the field experiments. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule size of cultivars/lines grown on the three different soil media. Plants grown on potting mix medium showed significant Increases in rust pustule size compared with Tripp (high pH) or Sharpsburg silty clay loam soils (neutral pH). A significant interaction occurred between soil media and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. A positive correlation (R= +0.5) was observed between the increased concentration of C1 and Mn,, and a negative correlation for lower K (R+ -0.44) and soil pH in the potting mix and larger rust pustule size of leaves. These results have implications for plant breeders and pathologists involved in evaluating bean progenies and lines for rust resistance.

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Maria Papafotiou, Barbara Avajianneli, Costas Michos, and Iordanis Chatzipavlidis

and manipulation of the pH is needed to determine the factors that affect red pigmentation and anthocyanin concentration in plants grown in media with CGC. The current work suggests that CGC can replace 50% of peat in a potting medium with perlite

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Mark A. Nash, Tim P. Brubaker, and Billy W. Hipp

Expanded shale and peat moss were mixed in 5 ratios and evaluated as potting media for Petunia and Impatiens. Two grades of shale (coarse and fine) were used. Bulk density increased linearly with increasing shale whereas total pore space and container capacity increased linearly with increasing peat. Air space of peat-fine shale was consistently lower than that of peat-coarse shale when the peat/shale ratio was the same. Container capacity of peat-fine shale was consistently higher than that of peat-coarse shale when the peat/shale ratio was the same. Growth and quality of both bedding plants increased quadratically with increasing peat in peat-coarse shale and increased linearly with increasing peat in peat-fine shale. Highest growth and quality of both plants were found in peat-coarse shale media with at least 50% peat and in peat-fine shale media with at least 75% peat.

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Richard J. McAvoy

Root-zone and plant canopy temperatures were continuously monitored as a poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex JSI.) crop was grown in the greenhouse under warm day/cool night [(+) DT-NT] or cool day/warm night [(-) DT-NT] temperature regimes. Day temperatures were imposed from 0900 to 1700 hr. Light levels photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) and outside ambient air temperatures were also monitored. Temperature differences between the root-zone and plant canopy microenvironments were most extreme during the night-to-day and day-to-night temperature transition periods. The temperature difference between the plant canopy and the root zone following temperature transition periods had been previously identified as a critical factor affecting stem elongation. Overall poinsettia height was consistently shorter under the (-) DT-NT than under the (+) DT-NT environment.

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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Abbreviations: EC, electrical conductivity; EC a , EC of the applied solution; EC e , EC of a saturated medium extract; ET, evapotranspiration; LF, leaching fraction; LI, leaching intensity; LR, leaching requirement; M a , mass of pot after

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Mathews L. Paret, Asoka S. de Silva, Richard A. Criley, and Anne M. Alvarez

industry has increased the use of potting media for production of ornamental gingers ( Criley et al., 2005 ; Kuehny et al., 2005a , b ), survival of Rs race 4 populations in the potting medium may be a factor in disease spread. The objective of the

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Mathews L. Paret, Ryo Kubota, Daniel M. Jenkins, and Anne M. Alvarez

released into drainage water when infected ginger plants were grown in potting medium ( Paret et al., 2008a ). However, no studies have reported survival of the ginger strains of Rs in field soil following different types of inoculation and under different

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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Abbreviations: EC, electrical conductivity EC a , EC of the applied solution; EC e , EC of a saturated medium extract; ET, evapotranspiration; LF, leaching fraction; LR, leaching requirement; M a , mass of pot after irrigation when at container