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aerated-steam treatment experiment, as well as a sandy loam soil, was used for treatments with different rates of metam sodium. The potting medium was placed into 20 × 20-cm resealable polyethylene bags (600 cm 3 per bag) and was moistened with 200 mL of

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A standard 1:1 v/v pine bark and sand potting medium was characterized physically by particle size distribution, bulk density (BD), total pore space, porosity at 50 cm H2O tension and porosity at >50 cm H2O tension. A potting medium identical to the standard was constructed from component milled pine bark and sand particles. Phaseolus lunatus L. ‘Jackson Wonder’ plants grown in the 2 physically similar media, under a standard cultural program, were essentially identical. Construction of a potting medium from a prescribed screen analysis provides a means to quantify variation which exists within a medium assumed to be uniform.

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Abstract

One of the most important aspects of the physics of growing media in containers is the limited bulk volume of the medium (2,4). Bulk volume (BV) includes the volume of the medium solids and pore spaces (1). Despite the importance of BV in determining the amounts of air, water, and nutrients in the pot, BV is rarely specified in research articles involving plant growth in container media. Without BV, volumetric properties, such as bulk density (g/ml), container capacity (percent by volume), air-filled porosity (percent by volume) and fertilization and liming rates (kg/m3), cannot be converted to absolute amounts per pot. The purpose of this study was to develop equations to calculate BV using pot dimensions and medium height in the pot.

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A calcined shale potting medium is useful to obtain intact root systems free of substrate. Root system structure and shape is retained with minimal damage upon removal from this medium.

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Abstract

Factorial experiments, including three potting media, two potting medium temperatures, and two air temperatures were used to evaluate growth of Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Fluffy Ruffle’ (Boston fern) infected with Rhizoctonia solani (the causal agent of aerial blight). Potting medium mixtures of sphagnum peat-sand, sphagnum peat-pine bark, and sphagnum peat-vermiculite-perlite did not affect severity (percentage of foliar infection) in four of five tests. Plant quality was highest for plants grown in peat-vermiculite-perlite in two of four tests. Potting medium temperature of 32°C reduced percentage of foliar infection in four of five tests, and plant quality in three of four tests. Fresh weights of shoots or roots were not affected consistently by potting medium temperature at 32°. Air temperatures ranging from 35° to 38° were favorable for disease development, with reduced development at temperatures above 35°. In vitro radial growth of R. solani isolates was optimal at ≈30° with a statistically significant reduction at 35°.

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Abstract

Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat ‘Fred Shoesmith’ was grown in a soil medium previously used to grow Easter lilies, Lilium longiflorum Thunb. ‘Ace’, treated with single drenches of a-cyclopropyl-a-(p-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidine methanol (ancymidol) in early February and harvested April 26. Enough ancymidol was retained in the medium after 76 days of lily growth and 52 surface-irrigations to significantly retard chrysanthemum growth. Plant height after 10.5 weeks was about 12 and 29% less in media from 0.25- and 0.50-mg (active ingredient) ancymidol drench treatments, respectively, than in untreated medium. However, chrysanthemums grown in a new soil medium in new clay pots were about the same height as plants in new soil medium in pots from the 0.50-mg treatment, indicating that not enough ancymidol to retard chrysanthemum growth was retained in the clay pots.

Open Access

Nine bean cultivars/lines were grown in a Tripp sandy-clay loam (high pH), a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (neutral pH), and a potting mix (equal volume of sand, soil [Sharpsburg silty clay loam], vermiculite and moss pest) (low pH) in greenhouse (one experiment), growth chamber (two experiments), and field (two experiments) in Lincoln, NE, in order to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska rust (Uromyces appendiculatus var. appendiculatus) isolate US85-NP-10-1. A factorial arrangement of soil media and cultivars/lines in a randomized complete block design was used in the greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, while a split-plot design (soil media as main plots and cultivars/lines as sub-plots) was used in the field experiments. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule size of cultivars/lines grown on the three different soil media. Plants grown on potting mix medium showed significant Increases in rust pustule size compared with Tripp (high pH) or Sharpsburg silty clay loam soils (neutral pH). A significant interaction occurred between soil media and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. A positive correlation (R= +0.5) was observed between the increased concentration of C1 and Mn,, and a negative correlation for lower K (R+ -0.44) and soil pH in the potting mix and larger rust pustule size of leaves. These results have implications for plant breeders and pathologists involved in evaluating bean progenies and lines for rust resistance.

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Nine bean cultivars/lines were grown in a Tripp sandy-clay loam (high pH), a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (neutral pH), and a potting mix (equal volume of sand, soil [Sharpsburg silty clay loam], vermiculite and moss pest) (low pH) in greenhouse (one experiment), growth chamber (two experiments), and field (two experiments) in Lincoln, NE, in order to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska rust (Uromyces appendiculatus var. appendiculatus) isolate US85-NP-10-1. A factorial arrangement of soil media and cultivars/lines in a randomized complete block design was used in the greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, while a split-plot design (soil media as main plots and cultivars/lines as sub-plots) was used in the field experiments. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule size of cultivars/lines grown on the three different soil media. Plants grown on potting mix medium showed significant Increases in rust pustule size compared with Tripp (high pH) or Sharpsburg silty clay loam soils (neutral pH). A significant interaction occurred between soil media and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. A positive correlation (R= +0.5) was observed between the increased concentration of C1 and Mn,, and a negative correlation for lower K (R+ -0.44) and soil pH in the potting mix and larger rust pustule size of leaves. These results have implications for plant breeders and pathologists involved in evaluating bean progenies and lines for rust resistance.

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Authors: and

Abstract

Volume of loose media was determined accurately by a devised mechanical method and used for bulk density (BD) calculations. BD associated with increasing percentages of pine bark and/or sand potting media were plotted. Linear increase in BD associated with increasing percentage of sand in the medium was used to predict the percentage by volume of sand and/or bark in an unknown mixture of the two components. The technique should be useful in synthesis studies utilizing pine bark and sand as medium components.

Open Access

and manipulation of the pH is needed to determine the factors that affect red pigmentation and anthocyanin concentration in plants grown in media with CGC. The current work suggests that CGC can replace 50% of peat in a potting medium with perlite

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