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As decomposers, predators, and pollinators, insects play a vital role in ecosystem health, e.g., decomposers help aerate the soil, turning more soil than earthworms, and increasing soil rainwater retention and tillage ( Pimentel, 2002 ). Predatory

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The exclusion of pollinating insects by covering strawberry plots with screen cages during bloom resulted in significant yield reductions and delayed fruit maturity in each of 4 years of tests. Fruit size of the cultivars ‘Tennessee Beauty’ and ‘Earlibelle’ was reduced as a result of caging but no significant size reduction occurred in caged plots of the cultivar ‘Blakemore’. A much higher per cent of fruit from caged plots was malformed and misshapen than fruit from uncaged plots or plots caged with honeybees.

Comparisons of data from plots in which insects were excluded with plots caged with honeybees and plots covered with open cages indicate that the results obtained from caging are primarily due to incomplete pollination as a result of insect exclusion. The data obtained support the conclusion that insect pollination is beneficial in strawberry production and that native bee conservation should be practiced in the vicinity of strawberry plantations.

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. Pollinator conservation in home gardens and backyards is currently a popular topic, especially in residential areas. Towns, cities, and suburbs can provide habitats for numerous pollinator insects as well as other beneficial insects and floral insect pests

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species and one native grass species and a single cultivar of each species. Nevison (2016) compared insect visitation for native Phlox paniculata and six of its cultivars. We could locate no published scientific studies comparing pollinator visitation

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Insect pollinator services are important to the global economy and environment. World pollinator services have been valued at €153 billion per year ($171 billion USD; Gallai et al., 2009 ) and pollinate ≈70% of global food crops ( Klein et al

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Pollinating insects have long played a critical role in the success and health of our diverse natural and man-made ecosystems. Over time, some pollinating insects have experienced reductions in both abundance and diversity ( Foley et al., 2005

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Abstract

Honey bees and drone flies are the most common insects found on flowering onions in New York State; 1216 other insects, representing many species, were collected from 3 areas in the state. Dialictus sp. and Halictus sp. (Apoidea) and 3 Diptera species are common pollinators. The observed species are compared with those on onions in the western states.

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Abstract

Open plots of strawbery (Fragaria sp.) or plots caged with colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) produced less malformed fruit than plots screened to exclude large insects. Bees and large Diptera, mostly drone flies (Eristalis spp.), were the most numerous visitors to the strawberry blossoms. A list of insects including 108 species representing 35 families frequenting strawberry blossoms in Utah was compiled. The most efficient pollinators were Apis mellifera, Halictus ligatus Say, and Eristalis spp.

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Recent pollinator population decline has become a global concern ( Gallai et al., 2009 ; Goulson et al., 2015 ; Klein et al., 2007 ). Pollinator insects are important because they contribute substantially to the global economy and food

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