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I.L. Goldman

I thank Paul Williams and Dan Lauffer for their inspiration, help, and guidance with the Wisconsin Fast Plant System, Geoffrey Schroeck for assistance with maintenance of the populations, the students of Horticulture 502 for their thoughtful

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Sunita K. Agarwal, David J. Schultz and Dennis A. Schaff

Most cells have an active turnover of many of their nucleic acids (particularly some types of RNA) which through degradative processes result in the release of adenine, guanine and hypoxanthine. These free purines are converted to their corresponding nucleotides through salvage pathways. Adenine is converted to its nucleotide form AMP by Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) which is one of the enzymes associated with the purine salvage pathway. Since all organisms have a de novo pathway for the formation of AMP, APRT is classified as a `salvage enzyme'. The APRT enzyme, in general, does not show a high degree of specificity for the exact structure of adenine and can also act on cytokinins and adenine derivatives like 2,6-diaminopurine, 2-fluoroadenine and 6-methylpurine. The APRT enzyme can utilize adenine analogues as substrate and convert them into their nucleotide forms which are toxic. Plants that lack APRT activity (APRT-plants) survive in the presense of these analogues. The amount of adenine analogue used for selecting APRT-plants is such that it kills all APRT+ (wild type) plants. APRT+ plants survive when grown in the presense of azaserine and alanosine that block de novo synthesis of AMP. APRT-plants transformed with the wild type cloned gene can be selected from a mixture of transformed and non-transformed plants by selecting in the presense of adenine, azaserine and alanosine. The presense of APRT activity can be confirmed by assaying for the APRT enzyme. APRT activity has been detected in many plant species. The presense of a positive forward and backward selection system can thus allow the use of APRT as a selectable marker in plant gene transfer systems.

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Erin Schroll, John G. Lambrinos and David Sandrock

-tolerant succulents [particularly stonecrop ( Sedum ) species] have been the dominant plant selections for extensive green roof applications ( Getter and Rowe, 2006 ). However, expanding the plant palette available for green roofs is desirable. Green roof vegetation

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Karen H. S. Taylor, Dr. Greg Cobb and Dr. Jayne Zajicek

Designing a landscape involves the selection of plants with certain characteristics such as height, color, hardiness zone, bloom time, etc. A Hypercard stack, which is a specific type of software application for Macintosh computers, was developed to aid landscapers in the location of plants with the desired characteristics. This Hypercard stack, called the “Plant Stack”, is based on the book, Identification Selection and Use of Southern Plants for Landscape Design, by Dr. Neil Odenwald and James Turner. The stack is also useful as an educational tool; for example, it can be used as a set of flash cards. Use of the software for selecting southern plants will be discussed as will use of the same software as an educational tool.

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I.L. Goldman

Wisconsin Fast Plants are rapid-cycling versions of various Brassica species amenable to a variety of genetic studies due to their short life cycle and ease of handling. I have recently developed a model system using Brassica rapa L. Fast Plants for teaching the cyclical selection process known as recurrent selection in the context of a course on plant breeding. The system allows for up to three cycles of recurrent selection during a 15-week semester and enables students to gain experience in planting, selection, pollination, and seed harvest during each cycle. Fourteen cycles of replicated, recurrent mass selection for high (H) and low (L) levels of anthocyanin pigment expression in hypocotyl tissue were practiced by students in Horticulture 502 during a period of four semesters. In addition to bi-directional selection; replicated unselected (D) control populations were maintained forcomparative purposes. Over 14 cycles, highly significant gains and losses in hypocotyl pigment production were realized for H and L populations, respectively. Plants in D populations showed no directional response to random selection and therefore did not exhibit genetic drift. Plants in H populations exhibited production of anthocyanin pigment in organs other than hypocotyls, suggesting selection goals could be modified to include pigmentation of specific organs or whole plants. Results from this selection program suggest significant gains from recurrent selection can be visualized through student-based selection activities in the classroom.

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Michelle M. Leinfelder and Ian A. Merwin

Apple replant disease (ARD) is a common problem typified by stunted growth and reduced yields in successive plantings of apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) in old orchard sites. ARD is attributed to biotic and abiotic factors; it is highly variable by sites, making it difficult to diagnose and overcome. In this experiment, we tested several methods of controlling ARD in a site previously planted to apple for >80 years. Our objective was to evaluate practical methods for ARD management. We compared three different experimental factors: four preplant soil treatments (PPSTs) (compost amendments, fumigation with Telone C-17, compost plus fumigation, and untreated soil); two replanting positions (in the old tree rows vs. old grass lanes); and five clonal rootstocks (`M.26', `M.7', `G.16', `CG.6210', and `G.30') during 4 years after replanting. The PPSTs had little effect on tree growth or yields during 4 years. Tree growth was affected by planting position, with trees planted in old grass lanes performing better than those in the old tree rows. Rootstocks were the most important factor in overcoming ARD; trees on `CG.6210' and `CG.30' grew better and yielded more than those on other rootstocks. Rootstock selection and row repositioning were more beneficial than soil fumigation or compost amendments in controlling ARD at this orchard.

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Kristine M. Lang, Ajay Nair and Kenneth J. Moore

( Ambrózy et al., 2016 ; Day, 2010 ; Díaz-Pérez, 2013 , 2014 ; Kong et al., 2013 ), which makes it more difficult to predict plant performance under shade within high tunnel production systems. Research from the Southeast region using shade structures in

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D.T. Lindgren

68 WORKSHOP 9 (Abstr. 662–666) Ornamental Plant Breeding in the Midwest

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John A. Juvik

Heliothis zea (Boddle) is one of agriculture's worst insect pests. Reduction in crop productivity and costs for insecticidal control of this cosmopolitan pest cost U.S. agriculture many millions of dollars annually. The sesquiterpenes (+)-E-å-santalen-12-oic and (+)-E- endo- β–bergamoten-12-oic acids isolated from hexane leaf extracts of the wild tomato species, Lycopersicon hirsutum, have been shown to attract and stimulate oviposition by female H. zea. Extracts from other host plants (tobacco, corn, and cotton) also possess attractant/oviposition stimulant activity to female H. zea. Studies are underway to assess the potential use of these and other phytochemicals for the control or monitoring of population levels of H. zea in tomato, corn and cotton fields.

The isolation and structural identification of insect pest oviposition stimulants in horticultural crop species can provide valuable information to plant breeders involved in developing cultivars with improved insect host plant resistance. This information could be used to develop cultivars lacking the chemical cues used by insects for host plant location and recognition. Risks of public exposure to toxic insecticides through consumption of agricultural produce and polluted ground water emphasize the critical need for the development of crop genotypes with improved best plant resistance as a supplementary method of insect pest management in agricultural ecosystems.

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Jonathan M. Lehrer and Mark H. Brand

Web sites such as the University of Connecticut (UConn) Plant Database allow large volumes of information and images to be stored, published and accessed by users for the purpose of informed decision-making. Sorting information on the World Wide Web (Web) can be difficult, especially for novice users and those interested in quick results. The advent of Internet search and retrieval software fosters the creation of interactive decision support systems. The Plant Selector was designed to complement the UConn Plant Database plant encyclopedia by allowing Web site users to generate lists of woody ornamental plants that match specific criteria. On completion of an HTML-based search form by users, a Web-enabled database is searched and lists of matching plants are presented for review. To facilitate analysis of the Plant Selector's efficacy, an online questionnaire was implemented to solicit user feedback. Survey data from 426 responses to the online evaluation tool were analyzed both to understand user demographics and gauge satisfaction with the Plant Selector module. Survey data revealed that most Plant Selector users are between 40 to 65 years of age and homeowners with minimal horticultural experience. A large percentage of Web site visitors (68%) is located across the United States beyond Connecticut and the New England region. The great majority of survey respondents (65%) use this tool to select plants for the home landscape. Most (77%) either agree or strongly agree that the Plant Selector is easy to use and delivers results that are useful (66%), while 70% agree or strongly agree that the categories used by the Plant Selector are sufficient. The survey results in general suggest that Web-based decision support systems may serve useful roles in the field of horticulture education.