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Abstract

Assimilation of 14CO2 by pistillate inflorescences and fruits of pecan [Carya illinoensis Wang (K. Koch)] was studied by autoradiography. Pistillate inflorescences and fruits assimilated 14CO2 throughout their development. The 14C assimilates were incorporated into fruit tissues.

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between shoot length and number of pistillate inflorescences. Materials and methods Six-year-old ‘Mahan’ trees (Lulang Pecan Ranch, Nanjing, China; lat. 31.78°N, long. 118.62°E) spaced 5 × 7.5 m were used in this study. The site has a freeze-free growing

Open Access

–2 m in height and width. Terminal panicles, ranging in width from 3 to 20 cm, form in mid- to late summer. Inflorescences consist entirely of perfect flowers, which may be white, pink, or blue. The fruits ripen into bright blue berries that persist

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Abstract

Differentiation and development of the pistillate flower in pecan, [Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch] were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Floral differentiation did not occur until growth resumed in the spring, when the outer bud scales were shed and buds were swollen, but before the inner bud scale was broken. Subsequent floral and inflorescence development were correlated highly with stages of bud and early leaf development. The organogenesis of the pistillate flower was described from inception to the stage of visible inflorescence.

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Cucurbit vegetables are predominantly out-crossers and depend on insect pollinators to transfer pollen from staminate to pistillate or hermaphroditic flowers for fruit set and development ( Robinson and Decker-Walters, 1997 ). Although there are

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Abstract

We found in light and scanning electron microscopic studies of buds of the pistillate ‘Kerman’ pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) that about 12 months elapsed from the time of inflorescence differentiation until the opening of individual flowers. Growth of the rachis and its lateral branches occurred from April to June; sepal differentiation, from late May to mid June; pistil initiation, from early October to March; and carpel development, from late March to early April. Cessation of the development of the inflorescence buds during July, August, and early September appears to be unrelated to nut growth and development, as buds were inactive during that period in both bearing and nonbearing trees.

Open Access

of Representatives 2018 ). This plant is used for several purposes, including food, fiber, and, most notably, its medicinal properties produced by the trichomes found in greatest abundance on pistillate inflorescences ( Bernstein et al. 2019 ; Small

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Abstract

Abscission of young fruits of the coconut palm occurred following sprays of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) and methyl-2-chloro-9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylate (chlorflurenol) at 2500 and 5000 ppm, but not if the inflorescence was sprayed prior to the time pistillate flowers were receptive. Fruits ranging in diam from 4 to 8 cm abscised the most readily, but occasionally maturing fruit up to 20 cm diam were affected.

Open Access

Abstract

Morphological examination of the vegetative bud of American holly, Ilex opaca Ait., shows it to consist of an apical meristem surrounded by leaf primordia and these in turn by fleshy cataphyls (bud scales). With expansion of the bud into a shoot, flower buds are initiated in the axils of cataphyls and a few leaf primordia. When flowers are not initiated in the leaf axils, vegetative buds develop therein and in the terminal of the shoot. The male inflorescence is a cyme with 3 flowers and the female inflorescence a solitary flower. Both staminate and pistillate flowers normally have 4 sepal points, 4 petals, 4 anthers and 4 carpels though 5 and 6 of each are frequently observed in individual flowers. Pistillate flowers bear no pollen and staminate flowers have only a rudimentary pistil. The trimerous primordium, though variously shaped, is the origin of leaves, cataphyls, resting vegetative buds, bracts, the calyx, and the inflorescence. Differentiation into leaves or cataphyls and inflorescences or resting vegetative buds appeared to be controlled by the physiological condition of the plant at the time of differentiation.

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The effect of Zn deficiency on reproductive growth of `Stuart' pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] was studied. At the most severe Zn-deficiency level, shoots were rosetted and produced neither. staminate nor pistillate inflorescences. At less severe Zn-deficiency levels, catkin length and weight decreased as Zn concentration in the leaf decreased. The number of fruits produced per shoot was reduced by Zn deficiency. Even though fruit abortion was not affected by Zn status of the shoot, fruit death and drying in situ increased with increasing Zn deficiency. Zinc deficiency dramatically suppressed fruit development and resulted in delayed and staggered shuck dehiscence.

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