Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 204 items for :

Clear All

Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station and the Michigan Pickle and Pepper Research Committee for their support of this research.

Full access

Proper variety selection and production practices are critical to obtaining profitable yields of mechanically harvested pickling cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.). On the Delmarva peninsula, the tractor-mounted harvester, which utilizes the pinch-roller system for separating the pickles from the vine, was used exclusively for harvest until 1998. The pull-type forced-balance shaker machines have been introduced as an alternative harvest system. Replicated commercial-size variety trials have been conducted for four consecutive years. The trials are planted twice during the growing season, reflecting the climactic differences associated with early-season and late-season plantings. `Vlaspic' and `Lafayette' are standard varieties. Promising new varieties include `EX 1914' and `SQRP 1882'. Investigations to determine optimum plant populations and row spacing have determined that three-row beds with 60,000 plants per acre provide the highest yields and best quality fruit. Optimal operating speeds and picking reel speeds of 1.4 mph and 45 rpm, respectively, have been determined for the tractor-mounted machine. Additional design improvements have been implemented and evaluated to reduce damage. Fifty-nine replicated commercial tests evaluating the tractor-mounted harvester and the forced-balance shaker type indicate much greater harvest and throughput efficiencies are associated with the forced-balance shaker harvester, resulting in improvements between $65 and $100 per acre.

Free access

Pickling cucumber production has steadily shifted to machine harvest as availability and cost of labor have become limiting factors. In a once over harvest, one needs to schedule harvest for optimum yield and economic return. This becomes a critical factor when one is scheduling both equipment and planting schedules. To predict the time for mechanical harvest of pickling cucumbers, one needs to know the relative fruit growth rates. Previously two cultivars were grown in the greenhouse and they were Calypso and H-19, a little leaf cultivar. Growth rates of individual fruit and combinations of two fruit at adjacent nodes were measured. The cultivar H-19 had overall slower growth rates than Calypso but the competition from adjacent fruit was less in H-19 than Calypso. The experiment was repeated with plants in the field and similar results were obtained. Data will be presented showing the growth rates of field grown fruit for individual and combinations of adjacent fruit. Growth rates were recorded for a population of fruit within a square meter. This data will be compared to the growth rates for individual fruit.

Free access

Michigan State Agricultural Experiment Station Journal no. 12900. We thank the Michigan Pickle Research Committee for support of this research. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal

Free access

Abstract

An Oriental pickling melon (Cucumis melo var. conomon) was crossed with a hermaphroditic melon, and the hermaphroditic form also was crossed with a birds-nest-type melon, with the goal of producing pickling melon breeding lines possessing a concentrated yield. Hermaphroditic and birdsnest breeding lines derived from these crosses produced markedly more fruits per plant and per unit area in a once-over harvest than did the pickling cucumber cultivars tested.

Open Access

In the United States, pickling cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) production was a $148 million industry in 2005 with over 47,000 ha planted [ U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2005 ]. Michigan, the largest pickling cucumber producer in the

Free access

Salted or sweet pickles made from the rind of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit are commonly produced in North America, Europe, and Asia. Among growers and food processors, there is an increasing interest in identifying cultivars suitable for industrial production of watermelon rind pickles. Cultivars for pickling should have a thick, white rind (mesocarp). The objective of our study was to evaluate adapted watermelon cultivars for use in pickling. We measured rind thickness of cultivars in eight North Carolina trials conducted in 1995 to 2002. The top three cultivars for rind thickness (22 to 24 mm) were Jubilee, Arriba and Charleston Gray (seeded), and Fantastik, Sweetheart and Triple Crown (seedless). Cultivars with the thinnest rind (7 to 8 mm) were Emperor, Scarlet Trio, Tri-X-464 and Carnival.

Free access
Author:

Abstract

‘TAMU Triple Cross’ is a three-way hybrid pickling cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) developed for mechanical harvesting. It is the first American pickling-type hybrid cucumber developed from three inbreds. ‘TAMU Triple Cross’ exhibits several outstanding characteristics including high yield, desirable fruit shape, dark green color, excellent processing qualities both as brinestock and fresh pack, broad spectrum resistance to cucumber diseases, and finally, an improved and less expensive system for production of hybrid seed (1,2,3).

Open Access

Fruit firmness is one of the most important quality aspects in the production of pickling cucumbers (Cucumis sativus) for industry. This study compared the fruit firmness of different cultivars and evaluated the usability of different firmness variables. Firmness of fruit of five to six cultivars from a cultivar experiment was measured penetrometrically over 3 years. The maximum load needed to penetrate the skin, distance at maximum load, load at the end of the measurement, and the mean work during the whole measurement were recorded. Different variables gave a versatile impression of the fruit texture. Although there were some differences in the measured values each year, the ranking of the cultivars was similar each year. Cultivars Celine and Servus had the firmest skin and overall texture. `Aubade' and `Carine' had lower skin firmness but the inner part of the fruit of `Aubade' was very firm. `Etude' was similar to `Carine'. `B2590', measured in only 2 years, had lowest firmness both in skin and flesh. The results show that penetrometric measurement of fruit firmness is a suitable method for analyzing the texture of cucumbers intended for pickling.

Full access

Abstract

An instrument for determining the force required to pull the peduncle from a cucumber fruit is described. Picking force was studied using the pickling cucumber cultivars Wisconsin SMR-15, Ohio MR-17, and Wisconsin SMR-12 in 3 positions in the picking force instrument on 3 harvest dates. Picking force was more highly correlated with fruit length than fruit weight or diameter. Regression coefficients of picking force on fruit length were homogeneous for cultivars, stem positions, and harvest dates. Significant differences in mean picking forces were detected for cultivars, position of the fruit in the picking force instrument, and harvest dates. The cultivar sequence of increasing picking force was ‘Wisconsin SMR-12’, ‘Wisconsin SMR-15’, and ‘Ohio MR-17’.

Open Access