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causal agent of foliar blight, root rot, fruit rot, and crown rot disease syndromes in cucurbits ( Babadoost, 2016 ). Phytophthora crown rot is particularly prevalent in fields prone to flooding, often resulting in total crop loss. Consequently, current

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. biochemical resistance factors. All accessions evaluated have shown resistance to Phytophthora root/crown rot ( Chavez et al., 2011 ; Meyer and Hausbeck, 2012 ; Padley et al., 2008 ). However, based on our study, not all accessions were resistant to

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, 2004 ; Hwang and Kim, 1995 ). Phytophthora capsici causes fruit, crown, and root rot as well as foliar blight ( Babadoost, 2004 , 2005 ; Babadoost and Zitter, 2009 ; Hausbeck and Lamour, 2004 ). Phytophthora crown rot is particularly severe

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are cultivated for food as immature fruit (summer squash) and mature fruit (winter squash and processing pumpkins), and they are also grown for fall decorations, such as jack-o’-lanterns and gourds ( Paris, 2016 ). Phytophthora crown and root rot

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described ( Paris, 1986 ), which includes pumpkin, cocozelle, vegetable marrow, zucchini, acorn, scallop, crookneck, and straightneck. Phytophthora capsici can infect C. pepo at any growth stage and is capable of causing crown rot, foliar blight, and

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Phytophthora capsici Leonian, the causal agent of crown rot, foliar blight, and fruit rot in many vegetable crops ( Hausbeck and Lamour, 2004 ). Currently, there are no commercial C. pepo cultivars immune to P. capsici , but sources of resistance to

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The stramenopile plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leon. causes root, crown, and fruit rot on a large number of high-value vegetable crops ( Granke et al., 2012 ; Hausbeck and Lamour, 2004 ). Initially described by Leonian as a pathogen of

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ratings of Cucurbita moschata accessions screened with a suspension of three Phytophthora capsici isolates from Florida. z Fig. 1. Disease rating (DR), 0 to 5 scale, for response of Cucurbita moschata germplasm to crown rot caused by Phytophthora

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The oomycetous pathogen, Phytophthora capsici Leonian, is capable of causing several disease syndromes in cucurbits, including crown rot, foliar blight, and fruit rot ( Roberts et al., 2001 ; Zitter et al., 1996 ). Crown rot appears at the soil

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Plants of four apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh.) rootstock clones, M.7, M.26, MM.111, and Ottawa (O.) 3, were grown in unamended potting medium or in the same medium infested with Phytophthora cactorum (Leb. & Cohn) Schroet., P. cambivora (Petri) Buisman, P. cryptogea Pethyb. & Laff., or P. megasperma Drechsler, causal agents of crown and root rots. Plants were flooded for either 0, 24, 48, or 72 h every 7 days for 4 months, then assessed for disease incidence and severity. Averaged across all pathogens and rootstocks, mean crown rot incidences were 2.5%, 6.3%, 19%, and 50% following weekly flooding periods of 0, 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively; when averaged across all rootstocks and flooding treatments, mean incidences of crown rot caused by P. cryptogea, P. cactorum, P. cambivora, and P. megasperma were 36%, 26%, 15%, and 8.8%, respectively; when averaged across all four pathogens, mean crown rot incidences after 72 h of flooding were 40%, 45%, 50%, and 75% for M.26, 0.3, M.7, and MM.111, respectively. In contrast, 72-h flooding periods in the absence of a pathogen were least detrimental to growth of MM.111 clones and most detrimental to shoot growth of M-26. Exceptions to general trends were reflected by statistical interactions among pathogens, rootstocks, and flooding durations, e.g., after 72-h floodings, 0.3 was the rootstock with the greatest amount of root rot caused by P. cryptogea but the least amount caused by P. megasperma. Differential disease susceptibility among rootstocks appeared greatest with respect to P. cactorum and least with respect to P. cryptogea.

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