Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 680 items for :

  • physiological dormancy x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Full access

Servet Caliskan, Sharon T. Kester, and Robert L. Geneve

Primary physiological dormancy is a basic concept for courses that emphasize general plant propagation or specific courses in seed biology or technology. Primary seed dormancy is a condition where seeds will not germinate even when the environmental

Free access

Alison E. Heather, Hector E. Pérez, and Sandra B. Wilson

morphologically dormant. Physiological dormancy is characterized by low growth potential of embryos or the inability of embryos to rupture covering structures such as testa, endosperm, perisperm, and/or pericarp. Combinations of morphological and physiological (i

Free access

Anwar A. Khan

158 WORKSHOP 24 Quantification of Plant Dormancy

Free access

L.H. Fuchigami and M. Wisniewski

158 WORKSHOP 24 Quantification of Plant Dormancy

Open access

S. Y. Wang and A. N. Roberts

Abstract

The physiology of dormancy in Lilium longiflorum ‘Ace’ was studied by determining the relationships between plant growth and composition and treatments such as bulb scale removal, cold treatment, field soil heating and chemical stimuli. Initiatory activity was continuous in the daughter bulb until its anthesis, but elongation of daughter axis leaves and internodes were normally inhibited until autumn. Inhibition of the daughter axis was high during the spring prior to anthesis of the mother, but progressively decreased following anthesis and disappeared completely by autumn. Balances of inhibitor-promoter growth substances were found in the bulb scales. Daughter scales were found to be the principal source of inhibitors. Treatments conducive to breaking dormancy included 40°F storage, GA3 treatment and field soil heating in early spring. Dormancy-breaking cold treatments were followed by changes in nitrogenous substances characteristic of dormancy removal in other species. The period of dormancy in the daughter portion of the lily bulb is of the correlated type and involves scale inhibition of axis elongation rather than initiatory activity in the apex.

Open access

Gregory A. Lang, Jack D. Early, George C. Martin, and Rebecca L. Darnell

Abstract

In the article “Endo-, Para-, and Ecodormancy: Physiological Terminology and Classification for Dormancy Research” by Gregory A. Lang, Jack D. Early, George C. Martin, and Rebecca L. Darnell (HortScience 22:371–377, June 1987), in the second column of Table 5 under part III-B (paradormancy), the term “Cryogenic endodormancy” should be changed to “Cryogenic paradormancy”.

Free access

Joanne E. MacDonald and John N. Owens

The effects of different dormancy-induction regimes on first-year containerized coastal Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii] seedling morphology and physiology in the nursery, as well as seedling survival and performance after one growing season in a common garden, were investigated. In early July, three dormancy-induction regimes were applied: moderate moisture stress (MS), short day (SD), and short day with moderate moisture stress (SD+MS). In early October, seedling height, root collar diameter, and shoot dry weight were unaffected by regime, but root dry weight was reduced in seedlings from the MS and SD+MS regimes compared with the SD regime. At this time, morphogenesis was completed in all terminal buds of seedlings from both SD regimes, whereas it continued in all terminal buds of seedlings from the MS regime. Furthermore, 25% to 88% of terminal buds from the SD regimes were endodormant, but none from the MS regime were endodormant. In March, budbreak occurred at the same time in seedlings from the two SD regimes and was earlier than in seedlings from the MS regime; root growth capacity was unaffected by regime. After one growing season, there were no regime differences in seedling survival, root collar diameter, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, length of the current-year leader, or number of needles on the leader.

Free access

Joanne E. MacDonald and John N. Owens

Influence of dormancy induction treatments on western hemlock seedlings. II. Physiological and morphological response during the first growing season on a reforestation site Can. J. For. Res. 21 175 185 Hallé, F. Oldeman, R

Free access

Leslie H. Fuchigami and Michael Wisniewski