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Efficacy of paclobutrazol was determined when applied to rooted cuttings before transplant. Cuttings of large-leaf Rhododendron catawbiense Michx. were treated with paclobutrazol applied as a 40-mL drench. In 1998, concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 10, or 20 mg·L-1 were applied to liners before root development was complete in February, or after cuttings were root-bound in May. The same volume of solution was applied to other plants at concentrations of 0, 5, 10, or 20 mg·L-1 in July 1998, after transplant to 1-gal pots. In 1999, a 40-mL drench of paclobutrazol at 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, or 20 mg·L-1 was only applied to liners in April. All cuttings were transplanted to 1-gal pots and set in the field. The elongation of stems was measured after each of three flushes of growth. Plants were far more responsive to paclobutrazol when it was applied before, rather than after transplant. There was a saturating response to paclobutrazol concentration and the half-maximal response occurred at 2 to 4 mg·L-1 (0.08 to 0.16 mg/plant). At low rates, later flushes of growth were affected less than earlier flushes. However if paclobutrazol was applied at 10 or 20 mg·L-1, later flushes of growth were inhibited more completely than early flushes. Flowering was enhanced by paclobutrazol. Paclobutrazol at 2 mg·L-1 applied to rooted cuttings before transplant was sufficient to inhibit growth of rhododendron, but not to the point where later flushes of growth were excessively short. Chemical name used: 2RS,3RS-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-l-yl)-pentan-3-ol (paclobutrazol).

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’s dissertation. Wadie F. Saleeb wrote an important PhD dissertation highlighting the exclusive role of caprifigs in providing the persistence (noncaducous) trait to female F. carica figs ( Saleeb 1965 ). In his glossary beginning on page 71, he provided the

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bulbs for persistence in warm-season turfgrasses and determine if flowers produced by early-spring bulbs provide appropriate pollen and nectar resources for pollinating insects. Materials and Methods Three field studies were established in Nov. 2015 at

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effects of simulated traffic on the persistence and surface playability of these newer cultivars. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fall traffic on the persistence and surface playability of bermudagrass cultivars. Materials

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heights used on home lawns and golf course roughs. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the impact of colorants applied in autumn at three application volumes on persistence of green color on lawn-height ‘Chisholm’ zoysiagrass. Materials and methods

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etoxazole (TetraSan; Valent U.S.A. Corporation, Walnut Creek, CA). The persistence or longevity and efficacy of translaminar miticides are important so as to provide long-term protection against the TSM under greenhouse conditions. As such, we decided to

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The objective of this study was to determine the persistence and leaching of the herbicide oxadiazon in five substrates. The substrate mixtures consisted of the following: peatmoss, compost, and sand in the following proportions: 1:1:0, 3:3:2, 1:1:2, 1:1:6, and 0:0:1 in 5-liter containers. Rates of oxadiazon used were 4 and 8 kg a.i./ha on two separate split-split plots. Each experimental design had three factors: five substrates, four harvest times (24 h; 1, 2, and 3 months) and five soil depths (0–2, 2–4, 4–6, 6–8, 8– cm). Only herbicide persistence and leaching from the various substrates were investigated in this experiment; therefore, we did not remove plant material. Substrate oxadiazon residues were determined by gas chromatography analysis, and it was shown that leaching was more evident in media with a lower percentage of organic matter. In addition, oxadiazon did not leach below 4 cm in conventional substrate (1 peatmoss: 1 compost: 1 sand, respectively). The persistence of oxadiazon was affected by soil composition and herbicide persisted more in substrates with great percentage of organic matter.

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Abstract

Reciprocal bud grafts were made over various time periods from 0 to 48 hours between (2 chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon)-treated and non-treated monoecious cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) to determine the persistence of ethephon to induce pistillate (female) flowering. Ethephon had no influence on sex expression in stocks if treated scions were grafted onto non-treated stocks. If rootstocks were treated with 250 ppm ethephon in the 2-leaf stage, femaleness was increased in plants grafted within 8 hours. After that, ethephon had essentially no effect on sex expression. The number of leaves (2, 4, 6, or 8) present at the time of application did not improve the effectiveness of ethphon in promoting femaleness when grafts were made 48 hours after application.

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The effectiveness of uniconazole for height control of Hypoestes (Hypoestes phyllostachya Bak. `Pink Splash') was determined, and the persistence of uniconazole with chlormequat and daminozide for limiting stem elongation in a low-light interior environment was compared. Spray and drench applications of uniconazole decreased plant height linearly with increased concentration. Two uniconazole sprays at 5.0 mg·liter -1, 0.05 mg a.i./pot uniconazole drench, or two chlormequat sprays at 2500 mg·liter-1 resulted in equally aesthetic plant size for 0.4-liter pots. Chlormequat was more effective than uniconazole for reducing rate of growth in the postharvest environment. No difference in postproduction rate of growth occurred between two sprays at 5.0 mg·liter-1 and 0.05 or 0.10 mg a.i./pot drench treatments of uniconazole. Chemical names used: 2-chloro -N,N,N- trimethylethanaminium chloride (chlormequat chloride); butanedioic acid mono(2,2-dimethylhydrazide) (daminozide); (E)-(S) -1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-pent-l1ene-3-ol (uniconazole).

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This study aimed to assess the persistence and horticultural value of bunch dichotomy in plantain. Meristematic tissue was collected from a plant of the cultivar UNN showing a double-bunch phenotype and cultured in vitro. Ninety-five seedlings were acclimatized for 6 to 8 weeks in a greenhouse, prior to transfer to the field. Field evaluation was carried out at three experimental farms (Abuja, Ibadan, and Onne) of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, in Nigeria. Micropropagated plants of two plantain accessions, `Agbagba' and `Obino l'ewai', that produce single bunches were included as controls. Reversal of the double-bunch phenotype to a single-bunch phenotype was observed. Few plants underwent an additional dichotomization event to produce three bunches. This suggests that branching may be due to random genetic events instead of a stable mutation. Furthermore, field performance data were not significantly different for phenological or yield traits between clones producing one, two, or three bunches. Thus, selection for increased number of bunches may not be warranted in this Musa population.

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