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Andrew H. Jeffers, William E. Klingeman, Charles R. Hall, Marco A. Palma, David S. Buckley and Dean A. Kopsell

opportunities for nursery growers. Several prior efforts have been undertaken to quantify cost estimates for various ornamental plant production systems in the southeastern U.S. ( Hall et al., 1987 ; Hinson et al., 2007 ; Taylor et al., 1986 , 1990

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Dong Sik Yang, Ki-Cheol Son and Stanley J. Kays

The use of ornamental plants in interiorscapes is increasingly being studied for their ability to remove volatile organic compounds, thereby improving the air quality of indoor environments ( Kim et al., 2008 ; Yoo et al., 2006 ). Deterioration of

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Genhua Niu, Denise S. Rodriguez, Raul I. Cabrera, Cynthia McKenney and Wayne Mackay

Oral Session 32—Ornamental/Landscape/Turf/Plant Breeding/Management 30 July 2006, 2:00–3:15 p.m. Oak Alley Moderator: Timothy Rinehart

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Tasneem M. Vaid, Erik S. Runkle and Jonathan M. Frantz

Plant quality is subjective and situational with desired attributes largely depending on the customer, plant, and season. For flowering ornamental crops, attributes of plant quality can include absence of insect and disease pests, presence of

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William E. Klingeman, Gretchen V. Pettis and S. Kristine Braman

, 1996 ; Hubbell et al., 1997 ). Garden and landscape enthusiasts are also willing to seek pest- and disease-resistant ornamental plants for residential landscape use despite initial public skepticism about IPM ( Ball, 1986 ; Garber and Bondari, 1992

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Jennifer Drew, Chengyan Yue, Neil O. Anderson and Philip G. Pardey

patents are 61% of all varietal rights and virtually all are for horticultural plants ( Drew, 2010 ). Ornamental plants account for 77% of all horticultural IP rights and 84% of all plant patents ( Drew, 2010 ). The steady growth of bedding and gardening

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Stephanie E. Burnett and Lois Berg Stack

increasing. In 2005, organic nursery and greenhouse production covered 3331 acres (1348.0 ha) in the United States. It is unknown how much of this acreage was dedicated to ornamental plant production, but conventional greenhouse and nursery production

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Yan Chen, Regina P. Bracy, Allen D. Owings and Donald J. Merhaut

systems increases mitigation capacity and provides efficient N and P removal that is important for small-sized treatment structures in urban areas ( Jayaweera and Kasturiarachchi, 2004 ; Stewart et al., 2008 ). In addition, when ornamental plants are used

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Amanda J. Hershberger, David A. Knauft and Carol D. Robacker

ornamentally as a shrub border or as a specimen planting ( Gilman and Watson, 1994 ). Vitex rotundifolia L.f., native to East Asia, Australia, Pacific Islands, and Hawaii ( Wagner et al., 1999 ), was originally introduced to the United States by the J

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Yann-Jou Lin, Ai-Tsen Su and Bau-Show Lin

greening performance differ with the choice of plant species and vary seasonally. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the cooling performances of EGRs planted with different ornamental species overall four seasons. Since previous