Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,790 items for :

  • ornamental horticulture x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Sophia Kamenidou, Todd J. Cavins, and Stephen Marek

methods of application on the horticultural traits of greenhouse-produced ornamental sunflowers. Silicon supplements were evaluated based on Si concentrations accumulated in plant tissues; visual quality characteristics such as height, stem, and flower

Full access

Cynthia Haynes, Ann Marie VanDerZanden, and Jeffery K. Iles

sales from edible food crops ( National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2002 ). A survey of Iowa's ornamental horticulture industry has not been completed recently; therefore, this research project was designed to gather and analyze data from members of

Free access

S. Christopher Marble, Stephen A. Prior, G. Brett Runion, H. Allen Torbert, Charles H. Gilliam, and Glenn B. Fain

negatively) from specialty crop industries such as ornamental horticulture. Carbon Sequestration Potential in Ornamental Horticulture Systems Ornamental horticulture is an industry that impacts the landscape of rural, suburban, and urban environments. The

Full access

James A. Schrader, Christopher J. Currey, Nicholas J. Flax, David Grewell, and William R. Graves

The extensive use of petroleum-based containers and synthetic fertilizers in horticulture provides unparalleled effectiveness ( McCabe et al., 2014 ; Schrader et al., 2016 ), but this level of effectiveness is achieved through heavy consumption of

Open access

Richard F. Stinson

Abstract

Ornamental horticulture has been recognized as an important phase of agriculture by vocational agriculture educators only in the last few years. In 1965, Hoover, et al. (1), concluded from a study that 1 in every 7 persons employed in agriculture in Pennsylvania was working in ornamental horticulture. The actual number employed was estimated at 21,391 persons. The annual need for new employees was estimated as 800 full-time and 1200 part-time persons. Although similar studies have not been reported for other states, general observation of educational activity in the northeastern, southeastern and far-western states would lead to the conclusion that the need for people trained in ornamental horticulture is being recognized in these areas as well.

Full access

Mary Lewnes Albrecht

Pi Alpha Xi, founded in 1923, is the national honor society for floriculture, landscape horticulture and ornamental horticulture. Since its founding, it has grown to 36 chapters at baccalaureate-granting institutions. Its mission is to promote scholarship, fellowship, professional leadership, and the enrichment of human life through plants.

Open access

A. A. De Hertogh

Abstract

At the University level, horticulture is one of the most dynamic fields in Agriculture. Undergraduate student enrollments, both for majors and nonmajors, have never been higher. The number of requests for graduate student assistantships are increasing. Extension personnel are under constant pressure from their clientele for more and more programs and information. The requirements for research have never been greater. In addition, with the democratic system which has been developed, scientists are spending more time on administrative matters than ever before. All of these points have their advantages and disadvantages but the time is past due for a detailed analysis of their impact on our programs by the individuals who are directly involved in carrying out the research, teaching, and extension functions. This is particularly true for those of us in the field of floriculture and ornamental horticulture.

Free access

Cynthia Haynes, Ann Marie Van Der Zanden, and Jeffery Iles

Poster Session 40—Marketing/Consumer Horticulture/Human Issues 20 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

Full access

P.E. Punzi, J. Nye, J.E. Swasey, and R.W. Thomas

This study was conducted to determine if there is a difference between the career advancement of alumni of ornamental horticulture associate (terminal) degree and nondegree programs. A survey of the alumni of three associate degree and three nondegree training programs was administered, using guidelines from career advancement validation research conducted at Alverno College, Milwaukee. Wis. (Ben-Ur and Rogers, 1994). Six programs were selected from North Carolina, Maine, Ohio, and southeastern Canada, including parts of Ontario and Quebec and all of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The programs were selected because of their perceived high reputations, as based on a survey sent to eight selected Longwood Gardens staff (Kennett Square, Pa.) and six professors in the Plant and Soils Science Department at the University of Delaware (Newark). Survey respondents were initially chosen based on their knowledge of the field of horticulture and of ornamental horticulture educational programs. The statistical analysis of the data did not support the presupposition that there would be a significant difference between the career advancement in favor of graduates from horticultural associate degree programs.

Free access

Michael E. Compton

Fifty high schools were surveyed in northwestern Illinois, northeastern Iowa, southeastern Minnesota, and Wisconsin to determine the number of students interested in pursuing a horticulture degree at a 4-year university. Students were asked several questions pertaining to horticulture. About 45% of our surveys were returned. Of the 451 surveys received, about 47% of the high school freshman, sophomore, junior, and seniors indicated that they were interested in horticulture. About 41% of the students interested in horticulture wanted to work in landscaping, 20% greenhouse, 14% florist shop, and 7% in turfgrass management. About 70% of the students indicated that they wanted to own and operate their own horticultural business. Almost 53% of the students indicated that they would prefer an emphasis/minor in Agribusiness or Business Administration compared to plant and soil science (19%), biotechnology (14%), plant breeding and genetics (13%), or comprehensive horticulture (1%) in combination with their horticulture degree. The above information was used by our School of Agriculture and Depts. of Biology and Business and Accounting to develop a major in Ornamental Horticulture.