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represents a set of production practices that are considered environmentally friendly on their own, such as pesticide-free or free of synthetic herbicides. To avoid strict organic certification and associated costs, growers may choose to adopt some of the

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Organic production is a manner of food production whereby people relate to nature to produce healthy food in a sustainable way. Access to the organic food market requires a guarantee that the product complies with the standards and principles established by the moral and legal authorities of organic production. In Latin America, Mexico is the greatest exporter of organic products, mainly coffee. Sales are estimated at nearly 500 million dollars, and certified field surface is 15,000 ha. The objective of this work is to show the certification process of organic production carried at Colima state. The University of Colima Organic Production Certifying Committee (CUCEPRO) is an organic production certification agency, a nonprofit organization, operating since 1993. Furthermore, CUCEPRO promotes organic production, a viable alternative and offer important information on the basic principles of organic production, the procedures which producers need to go through to have their product certified organic. CUCEPRO took part in the determination of the Mexican Quality Control Norms NOM-037-FITO-1995. This agency is constituted by Univ. of Colima teachers and researchers with great expertise on the different areas and processes of organic production. Certification takes between one and 2.5 months depending on distance, kinds of analyses, and seal production and issuing. In the last years CUCEPRO has certified more 3000 hectares of products such as coffee, sesame seed, banana, and mango, as well as honey, compost, and biological pesticides. Certification demand steadily increased due to reliability and confidence on CUCEPRO and to increased acceptance of organic products on the other.

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retailer interest suggested that economic opportunities existed for organic farms, yet farmers were either consolidating operations or those certified might have opted out of the certification program. This article aimed to understand why farmers who were

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growers are interested in organic production, but some of them have hesitated to switch to organic production partially because of the additional investment required for organic operation and certification and partially because of the lack of information

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proposed by Lord Northborne in 1942 ( Paull, 2011 ). In fact, the biodynamic certification standards ( Demeter Association, 2013 ) and those for organic farming ( International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements, 2011 ) are nearly identical except

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standards for agriculture and a certification program that certifies that agricultural products were produced using approved organic practices ( USDA, 2014 ). Currently, there are no federal standards for organic lawn and land care. The lack of universally

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certification has been recognized as one of the factors that restricts the consumption of organic food ( Botonaki et al., 2006 ; Lea and Worsley, 2005 ; Padel and Foster, 2005 ; Roitner-Schobesberger et al., 2008 ; Schmid et al., 2007 ; Soares et al., 2008

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cultivars that produce a medium- to large-size chestnut. Organic certification would help to increase the likelihood of purchase. However, “locally grown” is the most powerful attribute. Results on price effects suggest that prices of $5 or $7 per pound are

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With funding to increase support for organic farming research at land grant universities, organic growers have collaborated with faculty and administrators to develop an undergraduate, interdisciplinary minor at the University of Florida. Required introductory courses focus on general concepts of organic and sustainable farming, alternative cropping systems, production programs, handling, and marketing issues. An advanced horticulture course requires intensive examination of certification procedures, farm plans, soil fertility, and crop management, all of which are integrated into a required field project. Extension faculty have also fostered development of this new curriculum by coordinating regional workshops and field days in collaboration with organic growers and by developing educational materials on organic certification and related issues.

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This article summarizes the current status of organic vegetable production practices in California. The production of vegetables organically is growing rapidly in California, led in large part by growth in the market demand for organically grown produce. Key aspects of organic vegetable production operations such as certification and farm production planning, soil management, weed management, insect management, and plant disease management involve special practices. Many practices have not been thoroughly researched and the scientific base for some practices is still being developed.

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