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Suphasuk Pradubsuk and Joan R. Davenport

, concentration throughout the season in response to rapid leaf expansion and nutrient translocation from shoot tips to leaf blades and clusters. In both years, the whole vine N content gradually increased from the three- to four-leaf stage to veraison before

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Pradeep Kumar, Menahem Edelstein, Mariateresa Cardarelli, Emanuela Ferri and Giuseppe Colla

restricted uptake in eggplant grafted onto S. torvum rootstock ( Arao et al., 2008 ; Mori et al., 2009 ) compared with nongrafted or self-grafted plants. Nutrient uptake, translocation, and accumulation. Excess of Cd in nutrient solution significantly

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Dimitrios Savvas, Dimitrios Papastavrou, Georgia Ntatsi, Andreas Ropokis, C. Olympios, Hagen Hartmann and Dietmar Schwarz

translocation of nutrients to the tomato shoot as indicated by the leaf nutrient concentrations 92 d after planting ( Table 1 ). Similar results were obtained with the leaf samples collected 50 d after planting (data not shown). Of the two experimental factors

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Elvia Hernández-Gómez, Luis A. Valdez-Aguilar, Ana M. Castillo-González, María T. Colinas-León, Donita L. Cartmill, Andrew D. Cartmill and R. Hugo Lira-Saldívar

unaffected by K in the nutrient solution regardless of increased root K concentration at higher K supplementation. We suggest that the higher K in the roots may have increased the translocation of photoassimilates from the shoot to the root, allowing root DM

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Robert L. Mikkelsen

Potassium (K) is an essential nutrient for plant growth, but it generally receives less attention than nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in many crop production systems. Many regions of the United States and all of the Canadian provinces remove more K

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Suphasuk Pradubsuk and Joan R. Davenport

harvest, whereas up to 77% of Zn was in the trunk and cordon and ≈15% of Fe and Cu in fine roots throughout the growing seasons. Seasonal dynamics of B and Mn content shared a common pattern. There was a translocation of the nutrients from woody tissues to

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Safwan Shiyab

to most organisms ( Zavoda et al., 2001 ). In addition to the knowledge of uptake, translocation, or compartmentation of heavy metals in plants, an understanding of the tolerance mechanisms to improve plants of biotechnological interest is also

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Naveen Kumar, Fnu Kiran and Ed Etxeberria

; Tatineni et al., 2008 ). Research in psyllid-free greenhouses has shown that C Las is capable of translocating from roots to shoots ( Ebel, 2017 ). This translocation, coupled with reinoculation by psyllid vectors in commercial groves, results in uneven

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Bernard A. L. Nicoulaud and Arnold J. Bloom

Concentrations of up to 1.0 μm NiCl2 in a nutrient solution improved growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `T-5') seedlings that received foliar urea as their sole nitrogen source. Nickel in the nutrient solution decreased the amount of urea present in the shoots and increased the amount in the roots, although it had no significant effect upon leaf urease activity. These results indicate that a) the presence of nickel in the nutrient solution improves growth of plants receiving foliar urea and b) the effect of nickel was related more to increased urea translocation from shoot to root than to enhanced leaf urease activity.

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R.C. Apter, F.T. Davies Jr. and E.L. McWilliams

In vitro tissue-cultured (TC) and macropropagated (MACRO) 18-day old adventitious roots of Asian jasmine [Trachelospermum asiaticum (Siebold & Zucc.) Nakai] were compared for their ability to absorb and translocate radiolabelled P from a nutrient solution. Samples were taken at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after the initial dosage of the nutrient solution with 7.4 × 10-2 MBq KH 32 2PO4/liter. TC roots were capable of absorbing P, but at significantly lower levels than MACRO roots. Greater P absorption occurred in MACRO roots within the first hour and continued for the duration of the experiment. However, there was no significant difference in the rate of P translocation from roots to shoots between treatments. Root systems formed in vitro survived acclimation and had developed into well-branched root systems after 13 weeks. Reduced P absorption by TC roots did not limit either P translocation or survivability during and after acclimation.