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11, or when used as a potted plant when protection can be provided against freezing. ‘Minnie Finger Lime’ was selected and evaluated as a novelty or specialty cultivar, and its tolerance of common biotic and abiotic conditions is considered acceptable

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’ for the development of a gray ball as the fourth new cultivar in the Hollar ball summer squash novelties. During the breeding process, three conventional breeding methods, pedigree, backcross, and half-sib selection, were adopted. With the aforesaid

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perceived as being the most expensive juice types, with higher beneficial impact than the common products, and were grouped in a class named “novelty products.” Finally, cranberry was perceived as being both relatively inexpensive and the product with the

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, melon markets have changed significantly. Initially, the market for melons was expanding because the demand for off-season melons was growing. However, what began as a novelty became a commodity. In the early 1980s, these products were being supplied to

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Novelty Araliaceae potted plants were created by a wide variety of interspecific and intergeneric graft combinations. Twenty-four species of 10 genera were tested, of which 20 species of eight genera resulted in 85 graft combinations that grew. Intergeneric graft combinations with Schefflera arboricola included eight species in five other genera. Intergeneric graft combinations with x Fatshedera lizei included 11 species in five other genera. Schefflera arboricola scions grew more vigorously on Nothopanax and Polyscias rootstocks than on Schefflera root-stocks. The highest intergeneric graft compatibility scores for each genera included combinations with Schefflera. Plant propagation instructors may find these results useful in designing grafting exercises.

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Abstract

The novelty of greenhouses in the desert was certain to kindle popular imagination. Predictably, then, the news media have focused considerable attention on those built in Tucson and Mexico by the University of Arizona. Time magazine, among others, reported in 1967 on the experiments there in the integrated production of electricity, desalted water and vegetables. Someone in the prosperous but soil-poor Arabian principality of Abu Dhabi brought that article to the notice of his ruler, Shaikh Zayed. This chain of events resulted in the completion in Abu Dhabi in 1972 of the first large-scale power-water-food facility (see page 13).

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During 1995, 33 poinsettia cultivars were evaluated for Colorado greenhouse production conditions. Plants were supplied by the Paul Ecke Poinsettia Ranch, Fischer Geraniums USA, Oglevee, and Mikkelsens. At the end of the production period, Colorado greenhouse growers were invited to an open house and asked to judge the cultivars for plant, bract, and cyathia quality. As rated by the 24 growers, the best red cultivars in overall performance were `Freedom Red', `Nutcracker Red', `Cortez', and `Bonita', respectively. The best pink cultivars in overall performance were `Nutcracker Pink', `Maren', and `Flirt', respectively. The best white cultivars in overall performance were `Nutcracker White' and `V-17 Angelika White', respectively. The best novelty cultivars in overall performance were `Puebla' and `Monet', respectively.

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Flowers emit volatile compounds that attract pollinators. In ornamental plant breeding programs, fragrance is a significant character that adds value to flowers for its consumer appeal. In Hawaii, anthurium (Araceae) is an important crop used for cut flowers and flowering potted plants. Unlike other ornamentals, fragrance is not presently associated with commercial anthuriums. However, several anthurium species are known to have distinctive scents. To obtain the novelty trait of fragrance in anthurium, an understanding of anthurium scent genetics, physiology, and chemistry is required. Scented anthurium species and hybrids in the Univ. of Hawaii germplasm collection have been studied. Fragrance emission among species varies with time of day—some species being scented only in the morning, only at night, or all day long. Fragrance emission also varies with stage of spadix development, with some species having scent as pistillate and/or staminate flowers. The species sampled comprise five categories: A. amnicola, A. formosum, and A. lindenianum are minty; A. armeniense is sweet; A. gracile is floral; A. bicollectivum, A. cerrobaulense, A. folsomii, and A. harleyii are fruity; and A. supianum is fishy. Some of the chemical components are illustrated.

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The development of gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii H. Bolus ex. Hooker) as a floricultural crop is traced from its collection as a botanical novelty in South Africa to its establishment as a commercial crop in the 1930s. The origin of the cultivated germplasm, G. jamesonii and G. viridifolia (DC) Schultz- Bipontinus, is discussed, as well as breeding work that occurred in Europe and the United States. The contributions of the two species to the cultivated germplasm is unknown. Early breeding in Europe was conducted by RI. Lynch at the Cambridge Botanic Gardens in England, R. Adnet at La Rosarie in Antibes, France; and by C. Sprenger in Italy. In the United States, early work was done at estates in New Jersey by Herrington and Atkins, and by the commercial growers Jaenicke and the J.L. Childs' Seed Co. Establishing the cold hardiness of the crop for temperate climates was an early goal of horticulturists and breeders. Much of the cultivated germplasm can be traced to material that passed through Cambridge and Antibes.

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Common beans are recognized as a nutrient-dense food source that delivers numerous health benefits, but one of the barriers to increasing bean consumption is the limited number of common bean food products. Bean paste, made from bean seed and sugar, has the potential to diversify and expand the way beans are consumed. In this study, commercial white seeded otebo, navy, great northern, and white kidney bean cultivars and one colored cranberry bean were grown in two environments in Michigan and evaluated for bean paste qualities. Characteristics such as paste yield, color, flavor, and stickiness were evaluated on the bean paste. The genotype × environment effect was significant for many of the paste-making qualities and the color values of the unsweetened paste. ‘Snowdon’, the white kidney bean, had superior paste yield of unsweetened paste and whiteness of sweetened paste in both environments. All the white bean cultivars were comparable to Hime, the control otebo cultivar, in terms of low flavor intensity. ‘Powderhorn’, the great northern bean, had high stickiness of sweetened paste, which is preferable. The cranberry bean resulted in dark-colored paste with high flavor intensity. Seedcoat percentage and the ratio of L* and C* obtained via image analysis could be used as indicators for paste yield and whiteness score of the unsweetened paste, respectively. Overall, these results suggest that specific domestically grown white bean cultivars have potential for development as bean paste products, which would add a novelty to the processed dry bean applications in the United States.

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